Secondary Logo

Journal Logo

Institutional members access full text with Ovid®

Validity of the Worth 4 Dot Test in Patients with Red-Green Color Vision Defect

Bak, Eunoo*; Yang, Hee Kyung*; Hwang, Jeong-Min

Optometry and Vision Science: May 2017 - Volume 94 - Issue 5 - p 626–629
doi: 10.1097/OPX.0000000000001058
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Buy
SDC

Purpose The Worth four dot test uses red and green glasses for binocular dissociation, and although it has been believed that patients with red-green color vision defects cannot accurately perform the Worth four dot test, this has not been validated. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to demonstrate the validity of the Worth four dot test in patients with congenital red-green color vision defects who have normal or abnormal binocular vision.

Methods A retrospective review of medical records was performed on 30 consecutive congenital red-green color vision defect patients who underwent the Worth four dot test. The type of color vision anomaly was determined by the Hardy Rand and Rittler (HRR) pseudoisochromatic plate test, Ishihara color test, anomaloscope, and/or the 100 hue test. All patients underwent a complete ophthalmologic examination. Binocular sensory status was evaluated with the Worth four dot test and Randot stereotest. The results were interpreted according to the presence of strabismus or amblyopia.

Results Among the 30 patients, 24 had normal visual acuity without strabismus nor amblyopia and 6 patients had strabismus and/or amblyopia. The 24 patients without strabismus nor amblyopia all showed binocular fusional responses by seeing four dots of the Worth four dot test. Meanwhile, the six patients with strabismus or amblyopia showed various results of fusion, suppression, and diplopia.

Conclusions Congenital red-green color vision defect patients of different types and variable degree of binocularity could successfully perform the Worth four dot test. They showed reliable results that were in accordance with their estimated binocular sensory status.

*MD

MD, PhD

Department of Ophthalmology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea (all authors).

Hee Kyung Yang, Department of Ophthalmology, Seoul National, University Bundang Hospital, 300, Gumi-dong, Bundang-gu, Seongnam, Gyeonggi-do 463-707, Republic of Korea, e-mail: eye@snubh.org

© 2017 American Academy of Optometry