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Current Ptosis Management: A National Survey of ASOPRS Members

Aakalu, Vinay K. M.D., M.P.H.; Setabutr, Pete M.D.

Ophthalmic Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery: July-August 2011 - Volume 27 - Issue 4 - p 270-276
doi: 10.1097/IOP.0b013e31820ccce1
Original Investigations
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Purpose: To assess current practice patterns for management of ptosis by current ASOPRS members.

Methods: An invitation to participate in a web-based, anonymous survey was sent to current members of the American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeons (ASOPRS) via e-mail. The survey consisted of 4 sections: preoperative testing of ptosis patients, surgical preferences, dry eye evaluation in ptosis patients, and length of postfellowship practice. Responses were analyzed using standard statistical methods.

Results: Fifty percent of ASOPRS members performed more than 100 ptosis procedures in the past year. Most ASOPRS members performed preoperative photography, automated perimetry testing, and phenylephrine testing in evaluation of ptosis patients. A slight majority of ASOPRS members did not use preoperative Schirmer testing as the primary screening tool for dry eye disease. Most ASOPRS members performed internal levator aponeurosis advancement surgery, although most surgeons performing concurrent ptosis repair and blepharoplasty preferred an external approach. Frontalis sling surgery was performed using a wide variety of materials for suspension.

Conclusion: Current trends in the management and preoperative evaluation of blepharoptosis by ASOPRS members revealed a number of interesting common practices that are of value to current practitioners.

A web-based survey of ASOPRS members was used to determine trends in current management practices of blepharoptosis.

Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.

Accepted for publication December 13, 2010.

The authors report no conflicting financial interests.

V.K.A. and P.S. were supported by an Unrestricted grant from Research to Prevent Blindness, NY, NY.

Address correspondence and reprint requests to Dr. Vinay Aakalu, M.D., M.P.H., Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine, 1855 W. Taylor St., MC 648, Suite 3.158, Chicago, IL 60612, U.S.A. E-mail: vaakalu@uic.edu

©2011The American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Inc.