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Operative Neurosurgery Instructions for Authors

​​​​​​​​​​​PLEASE READ: The NEUROSURGERY Publications Instructions for Authors, containing full policies and procedures for authors, can be found here. Authors should review this section thoroughly before deciding which Journal is most appropriate for their submission.

Below please find the aim and scope of as well as submission requirements for Operative Neurosurgery specifically. Article types are described. Links to manuscript templates describing technical requirements can be accessed by clicking the Article Type name. Additionally a formatting chart listing the requirements for all Article Types can be found here.

Aim and Scope of Operative Neurosurgery
Submission Preparation: Operative Neurosurgery
Article Types
Articles Published In Print
Articles Published Online-Only
Digital Archiving
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Aim and Scope of Operative Neurosurgery​

Operative Neurosurgery is focused on the technical aspects of the discipline featuring operative procedures, anatomy, instrumentation, devices, and technology. Operative Neurosurgery is the practical resource for cutting-edge material that connects the surgeon directly to the operating room.

Submission Preparation:​ Operative Neurosurgery Article Type

NOTE: All submissions undergo a “Technical Check" to confirm their adherence to Journal standards. If your submission is not formatted correctly, it will be returned for corrections, delaying peer review. Please format your submission correctly to ensure timely processing. Additional submission preparation information is available in the  NEUROSURGERY Publications Instructions for Authors.​​

Articles Published In Print

Latest Articles that will publish in print will first publish online on the Latest Articles page of the Operative Neurosurgery site until such time as they are placed in an issue. Articles will publish online as soon as possible unless otherwise held for specific issue placement or embargo.

FULL-LENGTH ARTICLE TYPES

These article types cover a range of topics from neurosurgery. The information and data presented in these studies should be based on original research.

Review

Review articles are balanced accounts of all aspects of a particular subject including the pros and cons of any contentious or uncertain aspect. The Journal publishes 2 types of reviews:

- Qualitative Reviews are based on previous literature, are often narrative, and provide current guidance on the latest neurosurgery practices.

- Quantitative Reviews involve data analysis and predictions, can include control groups, and present discussions on certain neurosurgery techniques, tools/equipment, and implementation.

For systematic reviews and meta-analyses, see Research Reporting Guidelines for information regarding PRISMA and MOOSE.

Case Series

Case Series is a type of study that tracks patients with a known exposure, such as patients who have received a similar treatment (e.g., surgical procedure) or examines their medical records for exposure and outcome. Case series may be consecutive or non-consecutive, depending on whether all cases presenting to the authors over a period were included, or only a selection. Case series have a descriptive study design, unlike studies that employ an analytic design (e.g., cohort studies, case-control studies, or randomized controlled trials). See Research Reporting Guidelines for information regarding PROCESS.

Concepts, Innovations and Techniques 

Concepts, Innovations and Technique articles should present an experimental or innovative method, test, or procedure. The tool or method described may be new or may be an update or adaptation of an existing one. The tool or method needs to have been tested and, while not necessarily outperforming existing approaches, should show innovation in the approach or implementation. Authors must clearly acknowledge work upon which they are building, both published and unpublished.

Complication

Complication articles should consist of a description of a surgical (intraoperative or postoperative) complication that is unique in its occurrence or causation. They should include a concise clinical summary and images (diagnostic and intraoperative as appropriate) to illustrate the pertinent issues, as well as a scholarly discussion of the root-cause analysis and how it could have been prevented in the reported case and similar cases that other surgeons and readers may encounter.

Instrumentation Assessment

Instrumentation Assessment covers a wide spectrum from software to hardware. The Journal welcomes reports of advances in instrumentation. These should be accompanied by a candid assessment of their utility, their advantages, and their limitations. The assessment should be comprehensive and balanced. Important and relevant issues such as the status of regulatory approval, cost considerations, and conflicts of interest should be adequately described.

Instrumentation and Technique

Development of new instrumentation to solve operative problems may be reported as Instrumentation and Technique. The article should describe the specific instrumentation, what operative procedures it is designed to be used in, what problems it solves, and what improvements in the operative technique are made by the use of the instrumentation (operative time, safety, risk reduction, etc.). The report should be factual, supported by data, and original. Reports consisting solely of opinions or preferences will not be considered.

Technique Assessment

Surgical innovation in the form of new operative techniques and nuances to solve surgical problems has been an enduring aspect of the evolution of neurosurgery. Surgical pioneers are welcome to report new operative techniques with an accompanying assessment of the advantages and risks. Any supporting necessary instrumentation should be well described. The report should be supported by illustrations, animations, video, or other multimedia to embellish the text.

Technique Assessments should be factual, supported by data (clinical, anatomic, imaging, or otherwise), objective, and original. Reports consisting solely of opinions or preferences will

Editorial

Editorials are invited essays written and submitted by a member of the Editorial Board that represents the Journal's position on a particular topic.

Guest Editorial

Guest Editorials are invited essays written and submitted by a member of the neurosurgery community to express their views on an issue timely to the neurosurgery community.

In Memoriam

In Memoriam articles honor a member of the neurosurgical community who has recently passed away. In Memoriam submissions should open with an announcement of the deceased's passing including date of birth and death, cause of death (if known), and a brief list of immediate survivors. The body of the submission should provide a succinct overview of the deceased's life highlighting professional accomplishments related to the neurosurgical field. Location and date information should be included with the listed accomplishments. Authors are encouraged to include photos from the deceased's life but should note these may require third-party consent to publish.

Cover Essay

Cover Essays are invited submissions based on the Journal cover art. The goal of the essay is to illuminate the cover image.

Editor-in-Chief Registrar

The Registrar is an article type reserved specifically for communications from the Editor-in-Chief to the Journal readership. The Editor-in-Chief may use this as a venue to provide updates on the Journal and its features or to communicate his or her views on a subject timely to the neurosurgery community.

Articles Published Online-Only

Articles that will publish online-only will publish on the Published Ahead-of-Print page of the Operative Neurosurgery site until such time as they are placed in an issue. Articles will publish online as soon as possible unless otherwise held for specific issue placement or embargo. Once placed in an issue, online-only articles will appear as part of that issue online and will be listed in the Table of Contents.

FULL-LENGTH ARTICLE TYPES

These article types cover a range of topics from neurosurgery. The information and data presented in these studies should be based on original research.

Operative Technique

Surgical pioneers are welcome to report new operative techniques. Indications and applications of techniques, as well as any supporting necessary instrumentation, should be well described. The report should be supported by illustrations, animations, video, or other multimedia to embellish the text.

Because of their novelty, Operative Techniques will be considered as rapidly as possible and need not be accompanied by a full assessment (as with a Technique Assessment).

Operative Nuances

Reports on modifications of existing operative techniques (Operative Nuance) are welcome. Indications and applications nuances, as well as any supporting necessary instrumentation, should be well described. The report should be supported by illustrations, animations, video, or other multimedia to embellish the text.

A clear case for how an Operative Nuance differs from existing operative technique should be made.

Surgical Anatomy and Technique

Surgical Anatomy is the basis of operative technique. New information derived from anatomical dissections, imaging, or digital technology can augment the surgeon's knowledge and awareness of the operative field. Novel reports in this domain are welcome. A description of the pertinent anatomical revelations, the methods by which they were obtained, the operative technique(s) it augments, and pertinent data should form the basis of the report. The report should be supported by illustrations, animations, video, or other multimedia to embellish the text.

Technical Case Report

Technical Case Reports are case reports within the realm of Operative Neurosurgery. They may report an unusual clinical presentation of operative pathology, an unusual modification of operative or instrumentation techniques to address a one-off unique situation, or the occurrence of a hitherto unknown complication or previously unreported outcome.

Surgical Video

Operative Neurosurgery welcomes Surgical Video submissions covering a wide array of themes. A select panel of reviewers will evaluate submissions on the quality of video, narration, content, teaching value, and interest to the Operative Neurosurgery audience.

"Live" Surgical Videos

The Journal welcomes Surgical Video submissions covering a wide array of themes. A select panel of reviewers will evaluate submissions on the quality of video, narration, content, teaching value, and interest to the Operative Neurosurgery audience.

The following Surgical Video submissions types are welcome:

  • Microsurgery (2D or 3D)
  • Endoscopy (2D or 3D)
  • Cadaveric Dissections (2D or 3D)
Content Requirements

All videos for Surgical Video articles should consist of a brief narrated PowerPoint presentation of the case including relevant preoperative imaging followed by a narrated surgical video illustrating the most important technical aspects of the case. Videos must include embedded audio narration in English. Videos will be displayed on the journal site in aspect ratio of 16:9. See here and below for specific requirements for videos in Surgical Video type submissions.

Each live video (Endoscopic (2D or 3D), Microscopic (2D or 3D) or Cadaveric Dissections (2D or 3D) should include these four parts and their subheadings, printed at the bottom of screen at the beginning of each part

    I. Clinical Presentation
  • Neurological exam
  • Neuro-imaging findings
  • Rationale for the procedure
  • Risks of the procedure and its potential benefits
  • Alternatives and why they were not chosen
    II. Description of the Setup
  • Positioning
  • Any necessary equipment
  • Key Surgical Steps
    III. Disease Background
    IV. A brief review of clinical and imaging outcome.

An unstructured abstract limited to 250 words should accompany the video. In PDF, an image of the video will appear alongside the abstract.

Advanced Media Educational Surgical Videos

The Journal also seeks high-quality advanced media educational videos. These may include:

  • Simulation (2D or 3D):

Simulation videos can address a wide range of topics but should fall into one of the categories below:

  • Technical skills
  • Non-technical skills
  • Mock or experiences
  • Cadaveric and other and perfusion-based simulation
  • Team training
  • Quality
  • Patient safety
    • These videos should consist of a brief narrated PowerPoint presentation that should include the four parts listed below printed at the bottom of screen at the beginning of each part. Videos must include embedded audio narration in English.
      • Overview/rationale of the simulation,
      • Brief description of the setup and technology,
      • Educational benefit(s) of the simulated experience
      • Presentation/relationship to “live" surgical video
    • An unstructured abstract limited to 250 words should accompany the video. In PDF, an image of the video will appear alongside the abstract.
  • Surgical Animation (2D or 3D):

These videos can address anatomical relationships, surgical approaches or procedures, or other educational material. These videos should consist of a brief narrated PowerPoint that should include the four parts listed below printed at the bottom of screen at the beginning of each part. Videos must include embedded audio narration in English.

  • Overview,
  • Description of the setup and any anatomical relationships,
  • Surgical approach and operative pearls,
  • Presentation of /relationship to "live" surgical video.

An unstructured abstract limited to 250 words should accompany the video. In PDF, an image of the video will appear alongside the abstract.

  • 360° VR Enhanced Videos

The journal welcomes 360-degree virtual reality (360° VR) enhanced Videos. Authors should submit 2 videos: (1) a comprehensive Video that includes embedded audio narration in English as well as the 4 parts and their subheadings, printed at the bottom of the screen at the beginning of each part, as outlined under “Video Structure" below and (2) a 360° VR video that depicts and/or highlights any aspect of the surgical case. This video does not require structured headings or narration. Each video should be cited in-text as Video 1 and Video 2 and a complete legend for each should be provided. See the “Video Legends" section of these Instructions for Authors for more information. The journal is particularly interested in 360° VR videos that highlight operative anatomical relationships and innovative neurosurgical approaches:


Video Structure

    I. Clinical Presentation
  • Neurological Exam
  • Neuro-imaging Findings
  • Rationale for the Procedure
  • Risks of the Procedure and its Potential Benefits
  • Alternatives and Why They Were Not Chosen
    II. Description of the Setup
  • Positioning
  • Any Necessary Equipment
  • Key Surgical Steps
    III. Disease Background
    IV. A Brief Review of Clinical and Imaging Outcome.

Please refer to this published video as an example: https://academic.oup.com/ons/article/doi/10.1093/ons/opaa159/5854693

An unstructured abstract limited to 250 words should accompany the video. In print, an image of the video will appear alongside the abstract.

Please note that currently 360° VR videos can be viewed on desktop and Android mobile devices (headset or VR enabled glasses required). Currently, iOS users cannot view the video on mobile.

Guidelines for Preparing and Submitting 360VR Videos

These guidelines are for authors creating and submitting 360VR videos.

    ● Recording
  • 360VR videos should be recorded in a high resolution of 1080p. Due to accessibility concerns, we recommend not recording in 4k.

    ● Before submission
  • Certain meta data identifies videos as being 360VR. If the author's camera does not automatically add 360VR metadata, then it will need to be injected into the file before submission to the Journal. Follow these steps to add it:

  • Install and then open the 360° Video Metadata app.
  • Click Open and then select the video file.
  • Click Inject metadata.
  • Enter a name for the new file and then click Save.
  • The video is now ready to submit.
    ● Submission
  • Be sure to include a note in the author's cover letter that authors have submitted a 360VR video. Please also specify that the video is recorded at 1080p.

CORRESPONDENCE ARTICLE TYPES

The purpose of these articles is to provide a medium for contributors to provide fair and constructive feedback for articles published in Operative Neurosurgery. These correspondences can also address topics and subjects unrelated to published articles but which are relevant and cover a range of neurosurgical topics.

Letter to the Editor

Letters to the Editor discuss a recent Operative Neurosurgery article or a topic of neurosurgical interest not necessarily related to a published article can be submitted.

Response to Letter to the Editor

Responses to Letters to the Editor are invited from corresponding authors by the Editorial Office upon receipt of a Letter to the Editor regarding their article in Operative Neurosurgery.

Commentary

Commentaries are invited at the discretion of the Editor-in-Chief and can be a brief communication on a subject pertinent to the field. The option to submit a commentary will also be extended to reviewers once a submission has been accepted for publication. The goal of a commentary in this case is to enrich the reader's understanding of the article by highlighting a particular aspect of the given article or to offer an alternative perspective on the contents reported.

Book and Media Reviews

Book and Media Reviews are invited by the Editor-in-Chief. Reviews may cover relevant books (print or online) and new media (apps, platforms, etc.).

Digital Archiving

Wolters Kluwer provides for long-term digital preservation through two primary partnerships, Portico and CLOCKSS. Portico is a leading digital preservation service worldwide. The content is preserved as an archival version and is not publically accessible via Portico, but is provided when required under specific conditions, such as discontinuation of the collection or catastrophic failure of the website. CLOCKSS will enable any library to maintain their own archive of content from Wolters Kluwer and other publishers, with minimal technical effort and using cheaply available hardware.

Advertising

Operative Neurosurgery welcomes paid print and digital advertising from relevant institutions, organizations, and corporations. Advertisements are managed by the publisher Wolters Kluwer. Please click here​ to learn more about WK's Advertising and Corporate Services. Operative Neurosurgery's specific media kit can be found here. Advertisement design and copy are subject to the approval of the NEUROSURGERY Publications Editor-in-Chief and Director of Publications.

Contact Us

All queries may be directed to the NEUROSURGERY Publications Editorial Office:

Email: [email protected]

Phone: 847.240.2500

Mail: NEUROSURGERY Publications Editorial Office, 10 N. Martingale Road, Suite 190, Schaumburg, Illinois 60173