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POETRY BY CANCER CAREGIVERS

doi: 10.1097/01.COT.0000293400.95112.cb
Department: POETRY BY CANCER CAREGIVERS
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We welcome submissions from oncologists, oncology nurses, oncology pharmacists, and other cancer caregivers. E-mail only, please, to:OT@lwwny.com, and include your affiliation/title, address, and phone number.

She recently transferred to another nursing specialty, and the second poem describes her feelings about that, how she was able to relate more to patients with limited venous access

She recently transferred to another nursing specialty, and the second poem describes her feelings about that, how she was able to relate more to patients with limited venous access

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The Oncology Unit

By Carmencita Santiago, RN, OCN

  • I am one of your typical floors somewhere in the hospital,
  • My staff is compassionate, which is very vital,
  • Oncology care is what I specialize in
  • The care and support of the staff, you will realize.
  • I have various types of patients, you may call assorted,
  • From healthy looking and ambulatory to fragile and debilitated,
  • The staff camaraderie promote a conducive situation,
  • Of teamwork and dedication to their chosen profession.
  • We have a slew of dedicated, competent doctors,
  • They are caring and supportive and never a terror,
  • They promote collaborative relationship with the staff,
  • Consider this, “real hot stuff.”
  • The unit is oncology and don't you forget,
  • Where the care is unique you can possibly get,
  • From doctors, nurses and ancillary services,
  • You are a very important patient in my premises.
  • Patients come and go, stay maybe a day or two,
  • They regard me as a second home and a place to turn to,
  • I strive to provide comfort and a sense of belonging,
  • My end products are genuine care and patient well being.
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“Thank you for my PICC”

By Carmencita Santiago, RN, OCN

  • I'm the last person you wanted to see today,
  • With frustrated look, “my IV is out again,” you say,
  • Assessing your venous access, you are a candidate,
  • For PICC line insertion to improve your fate.
  • After a couple of tries, I managed to start a line,
  • You were elated but for me, not at all fine,
  • With IV started, you wanted to wait for now,
  • I still recommended that you needed a PICC somehow.
  • A few hours later, your IV got infiltrated,
  • To see me once again, you appeared devastated,
  • This time, several tries, for a successful stick,
  • You finally admitted that you needed a PICC.
  • I saw you the next day, you were all smile,
  • With PICC in place, you wanted to socialize for a while,
  • Encouraging remarks and showing your appreciation,
  • “Thank you for the suggestion” you concluded our conversation.
  • We as IV nurses, we need to be aware,
  • Of our clients' vein condition, treatments and plan of care,
  • Intervene early and be on top of the situation,
  • For the benefit of our patient, we can accomplish our mission.
© 2006 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.
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