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Proteomics and Metabolomics in Pregnancy—An Overview

Vora, Niraj, MD*; Kalagiri, Ram, MD; Mallett, Lea H., PhD; Oh, Jin Ho, BS§; Wajid, Umaima, MD§; Munir, Saef, BS§; Colon, Natalie, BS§; Raju, Venkata Nakta, MD*; Beeram, Madhava R., MD; Nasir Uddin, M., PhD, FAHA

Obstetrical & Gynecological Survey: February 2019 - Volume 74 - Issue 2 - p 111–125
doi: 10.1097/OGX.0000000000000646
CME ARTICLES
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Importance Pregnancy is getting more and more complex due to increasing number of complications that may affect fetal outcomes. The introduction of newer “proteomics and metabolomics” technologies in the field of obstetrics and gynecology may allow physicians to identify possible associated etiologies that affect the mother during pregnancy and lead to associated complications affecting the offspring.

Objective The principal objective of this review article is to provide a comprehensive evaluation of the use of proteomics and metabolomics in complicated pregnancies. Future studies that incorporate data from multiple technologies may allow the development of an integrated biological system approach to maternal genomes, proteomes, and metabolomes in pregnancy.

Evidence Acquisition and Results We conducted a substantial MEDLINE, EBSCOhost, and Cochrane database search for all the relevant articles containing use of “omics” technologies in pregnancy. We identified 197 relevant articles, following standardized systematic review process along with grading systems; 69 eligible articles were identified.

Conclusion/Relevance We sought to provide a comprehensive review in this emerging field of “omics” in pregnancy and associated complications. This article focuses mainly on use of proteomics and metabolomics identification techniques and possible interventions for early pregnancy complications to improve neonatal outcomes.

Target Audience Obstetricians and gynecologists, family physicians

Learning Objectives After completing this activity, the learner should be better able to describe the various complications of pregnancy and their outcomes; assess current available techniques and modalities involving proteomics and metabolomics; and evaluate and provide a comprehensive review of the use of proteomics and metabolomic techniques in various complications of pregnancy.

*Attending Neonatologist and

Pediatric Resident, Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine, and Department of Neonatology, Baylor Scott & White Health;

Director of Pediatric Research, Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine;

§Research Assistant, Department of Neonatology, Baylor Scott & White Health;

Chairman of Pediatrics and Attending Neonatologist, Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine, and Departments of Neonatology and Pediatrics, Baylor Scott & White Health; and

Director of Ob/Gyn Research, Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine, and Departments of Pediatrics, Obstetrics & Gynecology, and Internal Medicine, Baylor Scott & White Health, Temple, TX

All authors, faculty, and staff in a position to control the content of this CME activity and their spouses/life partners (if any) have disclosed that they have no financial relationships with, or financial interests in, any commercial organizations relevant to this educational activity.

Correspondence requests to: Niraj Vora, MD, Department of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, Baylor Scott & White Health, 2401 South 31st St, Temple, TX 76508. E-mail: Niraj.Vora@bswhealth.org.

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