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Effects of Mood Induction Using Movie Watching on Food Intake and Hormone Levels

Jampour, Leila, MS; Jafarirad, Sima, PhD; Cheraghian, Bahman, PhD; Behrouzian, Forouzan, MD

doi: 10.1097/NT.0000000000000329
Food and Nutrition Science
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There is a complex connection between emotional states and food intake. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of short-term emotion induction on food intake and ghrelin, cortisol, and insulin levels in healthy normal-weight individuals without eating disorders. Eighty-nine participants were divided into 2 groups (drama and comedy movies). After 50 minutes of watching, the movie was stopped and blood samples were collected, and then participants were offered a snack to eat. The visual analog scale showed that the movie watching had significant effects on mood induction. However, there was no significant relationship between the kind of movie the participants had watched and their choice of food, its calorie content, or the amount of food (eg, grams) that was consumed. This parallel-design study found that a 50-minute exposure to either a dramatic or a comedy movie affected ghrelin, cortisol, and insulin levels. However, these hormonal changes were not associated with intake of food from a buffet during the last minutes of viewing.

Leila Jampour, MS, is a master of science student in nutrition sciences. This article is a part of her master’s thesis at the Department of Nutrition, School of Para-medicine, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Iran, was registered in nutrition and metabolic diseases research center (ID: NRC-9509).

Sima Jafarirad, PhD, is an associate professor (doctor of philosophy degree in nutritional sciences). She is a member of Nutrition and Metabolic Diseases Research Center and also a faculty member at the Department of Nutrition, School of Para-medicine, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Iran.

Bahman Cheraghian, PhD, is an epidemiologist, and he is one of the main investigators of Hoveizeh Cohort Study (a part of Persian cohort study). He is a faculty member at the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Health, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Science, Iran.

Forouzan Behrouzian, MD, is a psychologist, and she is a faculty member at the Department of Psychiatry, Golestan Hospital, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Iran.

ORCID ID: S.J., https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3161-5329.

All financial support of this study was provided by the vice chancellor for research affairs of Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences (grant NRC-9509).

The authors have no conflicts of interest to disclose.

Correspondence: Sima Jafarirad, PhD, Nutrition and Metabolic Diseases Research Center, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Golestan Blvd, PO box 61357-15794, Ahvaz, Iran (Jafarirad-s@ajums.ac.ir; sjafarirad@gmail.com).

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