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Certain Selected Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Metabolic Syndrome

Pienovi, Lucía, MSc; Bustos, Patricia, MD; Amigo, Hugo, MD

doi: 10.1097/NT.0000000000000309
Food and Nutrition

The objective of this cross-sectional study of 735 adults 32 to 38 years old born in Limache Hospital in the Valparaiso region of Chile was to analyze the relationship between consumption of certain sugar-sweetened beverages (SBs) and metabolic syndrome (MS). The association with sweetened soft drinks (SDs) as part of SBs was also studied. No relationship was observed between total consumption of SBs and MS; 89% of the adults consumed SBs, with a daily median of 179 mL. However, consumption of greater than 400 mL SBs per day was associated with 1 component of MS: a high waist circumference (odds ratio [OR], 2.17; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16–2.51). The median consumption of SDs was 163 mL (p25–75 = 71.4–386). An association between SD consumption and MS was found. Consumption of less than 200 mL had an OR of 1.59 (95% CI, 1.01–2.51); between 200 and 400 mL, an OR of 2.06 (95% CI, 1.20–2.51); and greater than 400 mL, an OR of 2.07 (95% CI, 1.18–3.63), compared with those who did not consume them. Although there was no association between SB intake and MS, consuming SBs in high quantities (>400 mL/d) was associated with increased waist circumference. Greater consumption of SDs was associated with MS.

Lucía Pienovi, MsC, is a nutritionist, who completed her bachelor degree at Catholic University of Uruguay, followed by a Master’s in Public Health at University of Chile. She is currently a doctoral candidate of Programa para la Investigación Biomédica from the University of the Republic in Uruguay. Lucia worked for 4 years as a professor and researcher at the University of Chile, in studies related to nutrition and chronic diseases. Then she worked at the Catholic University of Uruguay as a professor and currently is collaborating in research projects at the School of Nutrition of the University of the Republic in Uruguay. Her research interests include epidemiological studies related to food and chronic diseases.

Patricia Bustos, MD, is a physician and a full-time academic associate professor at the Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile. Her research interest includes study of nutritional problems and their conditioning factors.

Hugo Amigo, MD, is a doctor in public health at the University of Sao Paulo, Brazil. He earned his master’s degree in Health and Nutrition at Harvard University. He is a full-time academic, titular professor at the Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile. His research interest includes nutritional epidemiology.

This work was supported by the Chilean National Fund for Scientific and Technologic Development (FONDECYT) of Chile (grant number 1100414).

The authors have no conflicts of interest to disclose.

Correspondence: Lucía Pienovi, Bulevard Artigas 4120. Montevideo, Uruguay (luciapienovi@gmail.com).

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