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HIV infection and its implication for nurse leaders

Nursing Management (Springhouse): October 2014 - Volume 45 - Issue 10 - p 31–32
doi: 10.1097/01.NUMA.0000455279.02347.8b
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INSTRUCTIONS HIV infection and its implication for nurse leaders

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HIV infection and its implication for nurse leaders

GENERAL PURPOSE: To provide nurses with an update on HIV infection with implications for nurse leaders. LEARNING OBJECTIVES: After reading the article and taking this test, the reader should be able to: 1. Describe current HIV screening and treatment. 2. Identify its implications for nurse leaders.

  1. The CDC recommends routine HIV screening for
    1. everyone ages 13 to 64.
    2. high-risk adults only.
    3. high-risk children and adults only.
    4. all newborns.
  2. Opt-out screening methodology is recommended by the CDC for
    1. primary care centers.
    2. acute care hospitals.
    3. schools.
    4. HIV clinics.
  3. The most rapid HIV test available
    1. requires a blood sample.
    2. is 99.9% accurate.
    3. requires specialized lab facilities.
    4. produces results in 20 minutes.
  4. An important responsibility specific to nurse leaders is to
    1. perform all HIV testing.
    2. provide specialized labs.
    3. remove barriers to HIV testing.
    4. determine who's at greatest risk for HIV infection.
  5. Current guidelines recommend starting ART
    1. with all HIV-positive patients.
    2. only when the CD4 count falls below 200.
    3. based on clinical symptoms.
    4. only after an AIDS diagnosis.
  6. What's the greatest concern about missed doses of ART?
    1. ineffective dosing
    2. adverse reactions
    3. prolonged treatment
    4. development of resistance
  7. A common early adverse reaction of efavirenz is
    1. urinary retention.
    2. dizziness.
    3. anxiety.
    4. dermatitis.
  8. The initial goal of ART is reduction of
    1. viral load.
    2. CD4 cell count.
    3. symptoms.
    4. infectiousness.
  9. Which condition is increasing in incidence among HIV patients?
    1. infectious esophagitis
    2. histoplasmosis
    3. Pneumocystis jiroveci
    4. chronic renal disease
  10. The Data Collection on Adverse Events of Anti-HIV Drugs Study Group showed an increased incidence of AMI proportionate to
    1. prevalence of NNRTI use.
    2. ART doses.
    3. duration of ART.
    4. traditional CVD risk factors.
  11. NRTIs, NNRTIs, and PIs may contribute to CVD because of their association with
    1. hypertension.
    2. dyslipidemia.
    3. weight loss.
    4. inactivity.
  12. HIVAN is characterized by
    1. proteinuria.
    2. edema.
    3. kidney shrinkage.
    4. hypertension.
  13. The modified Cockcroft-Gault formula is used to screen for changes in
    1. T-lymphocyte condition.
    2. cardiovascular function.
    3. renal function.
    4. immune system status.
  14. The most frequently reported fatal non-ADM is
    1. Kaposi sarcoma.
    2. gastric carcinoma.
    3. Hodgkin lymphoma.
    4. lung cancer.
  15. The increased incidence of non-ADMs may be related to all of the followingexcept
    1. ineffective treatment.
    2. increased life expectancy.
    3. immune suppression.
    4. premature aging.
  16. Ensuring the existence of resources and infrastructure is the responsibility of
    1. case managers.
    2. clinical nurses.
    3. nursing administrators.
    4. advanced practice nurses.
  17. An important goal of case management teams is
    1. public health education.
    2. retaining patients in care.
    3. facilitating screening.
    4. medication distribution.
  18. Which of the following statements is accurate?
    1. Each year in the United States, approximately 100,000 people are newly infected with HIV.
    2. Transmission risk behaviors decrease among people who are aware of their HIV status.
    3. Barriers to HIV testing exist primarily with patients rather than with providers.
    4. ADMs continue to define the HIV epidemic.
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