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Uncommon causes of noncardiogenic pulmonary edema

Simko, Lynn Coletta, PhD, RN, CCRN; Culleiton, Alicia L., DNP, RN, CNE

doi: 10.1097/01.CCN.0000553077.26034.e1
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Abstract: Although acute respiratory distress syndrome is the most common cause of noncardiogenic pulmonary edema, critical care nurses also should be familiar with several other less common causes, including transfusion-related acute lung injury, neurogenic pulmonary edema, preeclampsia/eclampsia, opioid overdose, high-altitude pulmonary edema, and pulmonary embolism. This article addresses the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnostics, treatment, and nursing considerations associated with each uncommon cause of noncardiogenic pulmonary edema.

This article reviews the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnostics, treatment, and nursing considerations associated with several uncommon causes of noncardiogenic pulmonary edema, including transfusion-related acute lung injury, neurogenic pulmonary edema, preeclampsia/eclampsia, opioid overdose, high altitude pulmonary edema, and pulmonary embolism.

Lynn Coletta Simko is an associate professor at Duquesne University School of Nursing, Pittsburgh, Pa.

Alicia L. Culleiton is a faculty member at Ohio Valley School of Nursing, Kennedy Township, Pa.

The authors have disclosed no financial relationships related to this article.

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