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Angiotensin II for septic shock treatment: An update

Griffiths, Carrie L., PharmD, BCCCP; Jackson, Matthew R.; Hoke, Tanner J.; Hertel, Kristie A., MSN, RN, CCRN, ACNP-BC

doi: 10.1097/01.CCN.0000546307.15415.e6
Feature

Abstract: Septic shock is a condition associated with life-threatening hypoperfusion that often requires vasopressor therapy. The FDA's approval last year of angiotensin II for use in septic shock may impact current treatment. This article reviews current literature and trials about the use of angiotensin II for the treatment of septic shock.

Septic shock can lead to life-threatening hypoperfusion, which often requires vasopressor therapy. Last year, the FDA approved angiotensin II for use in septic shock. This article explores the literature and nursing considerations surrounding this septic shock treatment.

Carrie L. Griffiths is an associate professor of pharmacy at Wingate University School of Pharmacy, Wingate, N.C., and a clinical pharmacy specialist at Atrium Health-Virtual Critical Care, Mint Hill, N.C. She is also a member of the Nursing2018 Critical Care Editorial Board.

Matthew R. Jackson is a PharmD candidate at Wingate University School of Pharmacy, Wingate, N.C.

Tanner J. Hoke is a PharmD candidate at Wingate University School of Pharmacy, Wingate, N.C.

Kristie A. Hertel is an advanced practice provider on the trauma and surgical critical care unit at Vidant Medical Center, Greenville, N.C.

The authors have disclosed no financial relationships related to this article.

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