Nursing2023

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Nursing covers the latest news in nursing and healthcare. See what's making headlines this month!

Wednesday, December 14, 2022

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As 2022 comes to a close, take a look at the most popular articles from Nursing2022, which continues to share evidence-based information on diverse and comprehensive topics to help nurses provide the highest quality of care. Enjoy these notable reads—all free this month!

NCPD: Asthma management updates

BY CHRISTINE M. GALANTE, DNP, RN, ANP-C, AE-C

Nurses' role in addressing social determinants of health

BY VICTORIA TIASE, MSN, RN-BC; CATHRYN DEGRAFF CROOKSTON, BSN, RN; ANNA

SCHOENBAUM, DNP, MS, RN-BC; AND MADELYNN VALU, MPH, RD

Manual and continuous bladder irrigation: Best practices

BY AMY LUCAS, MSN, RN, CCNS, CCRN-K, AND CYNTHIA W. WARD, DNP, RN-BC, CMSRN,

ACNS-BC

Academic burnout in nursing school

BY DANICA STEVENSON

NCPD: Dying to retire or living to work: Challenges facing aging nurses

BY JULIE HIDINGER, BSN, RN, OCN; STEPHANIE LU-HSU, MBA, BSN, RN, OCN; HOLLY OTIS-SMITH,

BSN, RN, OCN; EDWARD DE LA CRUZ, BSN, RN; AND NANCY PALECEK, MBA, BSN, RN, OCN

Adapting nursing programs to competency-based education

BY ANDREW WOLF, EdD, RN, AGACNP-BC, CNE

Updated AHA Basic and Advanced Cardiac Life Support guidance with COVID-19 considerations

BY KAREN BRANGAN, BS, RN, EMT-P, AND MARY PATRICIA DAY, MSN, RN, CRNA

NCPD: Fluoroquinolones: With great power comes great risk

BY TARA KIDD, PharmD; STEPHANIE MITCHELL; JULIE DEHAYS; AND ERICA WIBBERLEY,

PharmD

NCPD: Palliative care for patients with advanced dementia

BY RAMIRO O. NAVIA, MD, AND LORI ANNE CONSTANTINE, DNP, FNP-BC, ACHPN

Strategies to improve nurses' stress response during the COVID-19 pandemic

BY CAROLYN D. MEEHAN, PhD, RN; CHERYL D. SCHLAMB, DNP, CRNP; AND JULIE MCCULLOH

NAIR, PhD, RN, APHN-BC, CCRE

LISTEN TO THESE TOP PODCAST EPISODES!

Monkeypox: Key information for nurses

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Pearls and pitfalls of social media for nurses

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The Nurse Staffing Crisis Part 1: How we got here

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Tuesday, June 28, 2022

​​By Miller Huertgen

               "Would you rather hurt someone, or would you rather change the way you're speaking to them?" asked Vanessa Pomarico-Denino, EdD, FNP-BC, FAANP, at her session, “Expanding the Rainbow: Providing culturally sensitive care to the LGBTQIA+ patient," which was part of the Lippincott Nursing Virtual Event on June 16, 2022. The session focused on the healthcare needs of the LGBTQIA+ community and how nurses can ensure the provision of inclusive and high-quality health care. Pomarico-Denino is the lead clinician for diversity, equity, and inclusion at Northeast Medical Group, and serves as co-chair of the American Association of Nurse Practitioners on the health equity, diversion, and inclusion special interest group. She has also spoken at several conferences regarding LGBTQIA+ topics and authored Quick Look Nursing.

               She discussed how nurses can improve LGBTQIA+ patient experiences, the difference between gender and sexuality, the different terminologies for gender identity, strategies for nurses and healthcare professionals in communicating with and treating LGBTQIA+ patients, and more. “As nurses, as clinicians, it's really important that we understand and respect how our patients identify and use the appropriate terminology," said Pomarico-Denino. In order to gain the respect and trust of patients, nurses must respect them and treat them with care.

               The 2022 Lippincott Nursing Virtual Event featured sessions for nurses who provide direct patient care, as well as nurse managers and administrators, giving them an opportunity to earn up to 18.25 continuing education credits. The event's keynote address, “Exploring Workplace Generation through the Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Prism," was given by Faith Roberts MSN, NEA-BC, former executive director of spiritual care at Carle Foundation Hospital and Carle Physician Group in Urbana, IL, and a nursing consultant in Champaign, IL. Other sessions include “Managing Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome" and “The Essentials of Head Trauma: Recognizing the Risks and Providing Early Post-Injury Care." All sessions were presented by experts in their respective fields, and recorded versions are available on-demand until September 14, 2022 for those who want to get CE credits.

               The conference concluded with a presentation about the history of nursing by Christine Kessler MN, ANP-BC, CNS, BC-ADM, FAANP. In the session, “Through the Looking Glass: Nursing's journey from then, now and beyond," Kessler highlighted how far nursing has come over the centuries. She starts her journey all the way back in the early 19th century when Florence Nightingale became the “pioneer of nursing and hospital reform." She then continues into the 20th century when nurses were an important part of wartime efforts and traveled alongside soldiers to care for them. Coming into the 21st century, Kessler talks about nursing now and the advancements that have been made.

               Nursing now makes up the largest portion of healthcare professions, according to Kessler's research. Noting the importance of nursing care and of the nursing profession, Kessler discussed how nursing has and will continue to change post-pandemic. Telehealth, for example, is already on its way to becoming widely popular and accessible.

               Don't miss the session recordings at 2022 Lippincott Nursing Virtual Event (webcastregister.live), and be on your way to expanding your knowledge and earning CE credits.

Friday, November 5, 2021

​By Taylor Hayes

How can nurse leaders develop their emotional and spiritual intelligence to promote self-care amid an ongoing pandemic? Self-care expert, Dean L. Prentice, Colonel (Ret), USAF, NC, DHA, MA, BSN, NE-BC addressed this question at the Nursing Management Congress last month. Prentice's session kicked off this year's conference that centered around the theme “Best Practices for Thriving Now" to educate nurse leaders on improving the overall quality, efficacy, and cost of patient care in their organizations. 


“Self-care is more than just a day at the spa," Prentice joked in this presentation, recognizing the struggles of nurses amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Emotional intelligence is valued more than knowledge, technical skills, or traditional measure of intelligence because it determines individual effectiveness and successful business outcomes," he noted as he laid the groundwork for his presentation on self-care strategies.  

 To address feelings of burnout and stress in nurse leaders, Prentice focused on developing emotional intelligence (EQ) and spiritual intelligence (SQ) as forms of self-care—which are also two critical parts of personal and leadership development. EQ is defined by being motivated, self-aware, social, empathetic, and self-regulatory, while SQ is achieved by a higher level of self-regulation. People who possess strong spiritual intelligence typically think outside the box, stray from tradition, and solve problems differently.

It's important to note EQ differentiates high performers and propels leaders and organizations to higher and more sustainable levels of success, but SQ activates qualities of one's authentic self at a higher degree.

Prentice urged all managers to take steps toward both EQ and SQ because “workers and leaders that are better versed in emotional and spiritual intelligence make their place a better place to come to work." He also discussed the importance, synergy, and benefits of emotional and spiritual intelligence in leadership, ways to identify core skills needed to provide self-care and better leadership, and tangible steps to gain and maintain EQ and SQ.

The Nursing Management Congress offers four 90-minute educational sessions relevant to nurse leaders. Following Prentice's session, the second talk was a riveting story from Kevin P. Browne, DNP, RN, CNS, CCRN, who spoke about his experience of being a nurse executive and then patient at his workplace during the pandemic. In the next session, Amy Siple, FNP spoke about developing skills needed to effectively inspire and encourage others. The final session by Joyce Batcheller, DNP, RN, NEA-BC, FAONL, FAAN, focused on personal practices to become an agile leader and thrive in these challenging times. All presentations were recorded and accessible to registrants for CE credits until January 25, 2022. Register here to watch the recorded sessions and earn CE credits. 

Wednesday, July 21, 2021

​The highly contagious Delta variant of the SARS-CoV-2 virus now makes up an estimated 83% of new COVID-19 cases in the US, according to the CDC.

Dr. Rochelle Walensky, the director of the CDC, announced the new estimates during a hearing of the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions. The new data can now be found on the CDC's website.

Cases of the Delta variant have surged in the US. The variant had accounted for approximately 32% of COVID-19 cases in the US as of June 19 and 62% of cases as of July 3, according to CDC data.

The rise of the variant coincides with a significant increase in coronavirus cases across every state over the last 2 weeks. COVID-19 hospitalizations and deaths are also on the rise, according to the CDC, but new cases, hospitalizations, and deaths are still far lower than they were at their peaks in January and February 2021.

However, the vast majority of new cases, hospitalizations, and deaths are among people who are not vaccinated. Tuesday's hearing before Congress followed a White House briefing last week in which Walensky warned that COVID-19 is “becoming a pandemic of the unvaccinated." Officials at that briefing said that more of 97% of people who are being hospitalized with COVID-19 are unvaccinated, and 99.5% of new deaths are among the unvaccinated.

CDC data show that nearly 60% of adults and nearly 50% of the total population are fully vaccinated in the US, but vaccination rates have slowed since the spring.

Monday, June 7, 2021

​By Allana Marie Brown, DNP, PMHNP-BC

Nurses are currently in crisis. The need for tangible support in a fragmented healthcare delivery system is dire. In some settings, nurses are still less than fully equipped to meet care demands amid fluctuating rates of COVID-19 within the US. Although this has become an issue of shared concern among other essential healthcare workers, nurses are particularly challenged as the largest frontline entity within the healthcare industry.  Nurses continue to contend with repeated exposure to infection and death, minimal protection, ethical dilemmas, bureaucratic issues, work-life imbalance, and varying degrees of trauma linked to the COVID-19 pandemic.1,2

Many nurses have come out of retirement to help combat COVID-19, continuing the profession's proud history of rising to the occasion as necessary. The COVID-19 pandemic has proven to be no exception when it comes to nurses' carrying out their commitment to the profession and patient care. However, acts of heroism in these times ought not to be mistaken for the notion that nurses are invulnerable to COVID-19 itself and its associated health risks. Every day, nurses and other healthcare workers are grappling with all types of stress surrounding the pandemic. The emotional toll includes an increase in conditions such as depression, anxiety, and insomnia, and these are being reported at a rate greater than that of other pandemics.3-5 Studies from China investigating healthcare worker exposure to COVID-19 have shown that nurses are especially vulnerable to psychological distress characterized by depression, anxiety, insomnia, and suicidal ideations.6-8 As similar findings emerge so will the need to secure the health and well-being of nurses and other frontline workers.

Mental health associations such as the American Psychological Association and the American Psychiatric Nurses Association have made various resources freely available to promote mental health and wellness during this time.9,10  Other interventions and resources include the deployment of mental health expertise and access to therapeutic services at the workplace.

The call for support and relief efforts have been made clear by nurses given a platform to speak out on the impact COVID-19. President Dr. Ernest Grant and Chief Nursing Officer Dr. Debbie Hatmaker of the American Nurses Association have made public appearances on major news networks to discuss current practice issues and advocate for better working conditions for frontline nurses rendering care to patients stricken by the novel virus.11,12 A critical care nurse from Arizona gained the nation's attention with her noteworthy demonstration against residents of the state who refuse to follow and adhere to COVID-19 health precautions.13

Nurses must continue to use their voices to raise awareness about concerns that affect the health and vitality of the profession, regardless of how futile these attempts sometimes seem to be in reversing the conditions of our healthcare climate. Safe care and quality assurance depend on nurses who feel heard and well-supported to lead efforts for change. Peer advocacy and support systems should be readily available and called upon with a sense of urgency. In doing so, we can help deter the long-term effects of psychological burdens, mitigate the impact of stress, and build a more resilient healthcare workforce in the face of COVID-19 and future healthcare challenges.


REFERENCES

1. NBC News. Why some nurses have quit during the coronavirus pandemic. 2020.  https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/why-some-nurses-have-quit-during-coronavirus-pandemic-n1201796.

2. WebMD. U.S. nurses already facing severe stress over coronavirus. 2020.  https://www.webmd.com/lung/news/20200323/us-nurses-already-facing-severe-stress-over-coronavirus#1.

3. Pappa S, Ntella V, Giannakas T, Giannakoulis VG, Papoutsi E, Katsaounou P. Prevalence of depression, anxiety, and insomnia among healthcare workers during the COVID-19 pandemic: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Brain Behav Immun. 2020; 88:901-907.

4.  Stelnicki AM, Carleton RN, Reichert C. Nurses' mental health and well-being: COVID-19 impacts. Can J Nurs Res. 2020; 52(3):237-239.

5. Wong AH, Pacella-Labarbara ML, Ray JM, Ranney ML, Chang BP. Healing the healer: protecting emergency health care workers' mental health during COVID-19. Ann Emerg Med. 2020; 76(4):379-384.

6.  Du J, Dong L, Wang T, et al. Psychological symptoms among frontline healthcare workers during COVID-19 outbreak in Wuhan. Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 2020; 67:144-145.

7.  Lai J, Ma S, Wang Y, et al. Factors associated with mental health outcomes among health  care workers exposed to coronavirus disease 2019. JAMA Netw Open. 2020; 3(3): e203976.

8.  Shen X, Zou X, Zhong X, Yan J, Li L. Psychological stress of ICU nurses in the time of COVID-19. Crit Care. 2020;24(1):200.

9.  American Psychological Association. COVID-19 information and resources. 2020.  https://www.apa.org/topics/covid-19.

10.  American Psychiatric Nurses Association. COVID-19: Tips & resources for psychiatric-mental health nurses. 2020.  https://www.apna.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageid=6686.

11.  American Nurses Association. COVID-19 interview with Debbie Hatmaker on CNN. 2020. https://www.nursingworld.org/practice-policy/work-environment/health-safety/disaster-preparedness/coronavirus/covid-19-interview-with-debbie-hatmaker-on-cnn.

12. Fox News. American nurses association launches relief fund amid coronavirus crisis.  2020. https://video.foxnews.com/v/6146381051001.

13. ABC News. Why this ICU nurse stood up to people protesting stay-at-home orders. 2020. https://abcnews.go.com/Health/icu-nurse-stood-people-protesting-stay-home-orders/story?id=70554778.


Allana Marie Brown is a psychiatric NP at St. Vincent's Hospital Westchester in White Plains, NY. ​