Secondary Logo

Journal Logo

Letters

Vernon, Ke'shaun; Nichols, Karen MSN, RN-BC, RT(R)(M)(CV)

doi: 10.1097/01.NURSE.0000529811.36654.ae
Department: LETTERS
Free

More caution needed before triathlons...obstructive sleep apnea screening

Hutchinson, Kan.

Grapevine, Tex.

Send comments to Haley.McKinney@wolterskluwer.com. Please, no attachments. You can also like us on Facebook (NsgJournal) and message us with your feedback! Send letters to Letters Editor, Nursing2018, Wolters Kluwer Health, Two Commerce Square, 2001 Market Street, 4th floor, Philadelphia, PA 19103. Be sure to include your name, credentials, e-mail address, and daytime phone number. Letters are edited for content, length, and grammar. Submission of a letter will constitute the author's permission to publish it but doesn't guarantee publication. Letters become the property of Nursing journal and may be published in all media.

Back to Top | Article Outline

More caution needed before triathlons

Figure

Figure

I just read “Triathlons more risky for men than marathons” (Clinical Rounds, November 2017), which reported that men and women, but mostly men, are dying from cardiac arrest while competing in triathlon events. I'm concerned that we haven't done enough to prevent deaths caused by triathlons. I think that we need to pay more attention to every athlete's health before the competition. Assessing every competitor's health status beforehand might help reduce injuries and prevent deaths.

—KE'SHAUN VERNON

Hutchinson, Kan.

Back to Top | Article Outline

Obstructive sleep apnea screening

In the hospital, admission screening for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is important. Family members, especially bed partners, play a significant role in helping nurses identify patients at risk for OSA. Nurses also need to encourage patients diagnosed with OSA to adhere to their prescribed therapy, particularly if they have a history of atrial fibrillation (AF).

Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy is an important preventive measure that helps minimize additional hospitalizations and complications such as stroke in patients with AF. According to research, CPAP use by patients with OSA decreases AF recurrence by 43%.1 Nurses need to be aware of controllable risk factors for patients with AF so they can educate patients and their families about the critical importance of following treatment regimens.

—KAREN NICHOLS, MSN, RN-BC, RT(R)(M)(CV)

Grapevine, Tex.

Back to Top | Article Outline

REFERENCE

1. Boyles S. Stroke rounds: sleep apnea treatment may cut Afib recurrence. 2015. http://www.medpagetoday.com/cardiology/arrhythmias/51113.
Copyright © 2018 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.