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Novel Functional Renal PET Imaging With 18F-FDS in Human Subjects

Werner, Rudolf A., MD*,†,‡; Ordonez, Alvaro A., MD§,∥; Sanchez-Bautista, Julian, MD§,∥; Marcus, Charles, MD*; Lapa, Constantin, MD; Rowe, Steven P., MD, PhD*; Pomper, Martin G., MD, PhD*; Leal, Jeffrey P., BA*; Lodge, Martin A., PhD*; Javadi, Mehrbod S., MD*; Jain, Sanjay K., MD*,§,∥; Higuchi, Takahiro, MD, PhD†,‡,¶,**

doi: 10.1097/RLU.0000000000002494
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The novel PET probe 18F-fluoro-D-sorbitol">2-deoxy-2-18F-fluoro-D-sorbitol (18F-FDS) has demonstrated favorable renal kinetics in animals. We aimed to elucidate its imaging properties in 2 human volunteers. 18F-FDS was produced by a simple 1-step reduction from 18F-FDG. On dynamic renal PET, the cortex was delineated and activity gradually transited in the parenchyma, followed by radiotracer excretion. No adverse effects were reported. Given the higher spatiotemporal resolution of PET relative to conventional scintigraphy, 18F-FDS PET offers a more thorough evaluation of human renal kinetics. Due to its simple production from 18F-FDG, 18F-FDS is virtually available at any PET facility with radiochemistry infrastructure.

From the *Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins School University of Medicine, Baltimore, MD;

Department of Nuclear Medicine, and

Comprehensive Heart Failure Center, University Hospital, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany;

§Center for Infection and Inflammation Imaging Research, and

Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD;

Department of Biomedical Imaging, National Cardiovascular and Cerebral Research Center, Suita; and

**Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama, Japan.

Received for publication November 27, 2018; revision accepted December 31, 2018.

Conflicts of interest and sources of funding: This work was supported by the Competence Network of Heart Failure funded by the Integrated Research and Treatment Center of the Federal Ministry of Education and Research, NIH R01-HL131829, and German Research Council (DFG grant HI 1789/3-3). This project has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie grant agreement no. 701983. None declared to all authors.

Correspondence to: Takahiro Higuchi, MD, PhD, Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Würzburg, Oberdürrbacherstr. 6, 97080 Würzburg, Germany. E-mail: thiguchi@me.com.

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 (CCBY), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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      Keywords:

      18F-fluoro-D-sorbitol">2-deoxy-2-18F-fluoro-D-sorbitol; 18F-FDS; renal imaging; PET; split renal function; kidney

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