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Three-Dimensional Surface Display with I-123 IMP of Slowly Progressive Apraxia

OKUDA, BUNGO, M.D.1; TACHIBANA, HISAO, M.D.1; KAWABATA, KEITA, M.D.1; SUGITA, MINORU, M.D.1; FUKUCHI, MINORU, M.D.*

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A 72-year-old, right-handed man was experiencing slowly progressive limb apraxia with muscle rigidity for 3 years, which predominated on the right side. The patient's clinical manifestations suggested a degenerative disease involving both the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia. A brain CT scan revealed no causative lesion. However, a three-dimensional surface display generated from I-123 IMP scans showed regional hypoperfusion primarily in the left central region between the frontal and parietal cortices, which could be responsible for the patient's apraxia. The imaging method appears to be useful for detecting cortical lesions even in neurodegenerative disease.

1From the Fifth Department of Internal Medicine, Hyogo College of Medicine, Nishinomiya, Japan

*From the Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hyogo College of Medicine, Nishinomiya, Japan

© Lippincott-Raven Publishers.