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Giant Tumoral Calcinosis Demonstrated by Bone Scintigraphy

HARDOFF, RUTH, M.D., D.Sc.*; RUDOY, JACOB, M.D.; GIPS, SARA, M.D.*; LEIBA, MARCEL, M.D.; BEN-ARI, JACKIE, M.D.

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Soft tissue calcification, or tumoral calcinosis, is an increasingly frequent symptomatic complication of uremic osteodystrophy. Hyperphosphatemia, or an increased Ca × P product, which is usually associated with secondary hyperparathyroidism, is an important component of this complication. Non-visceral calcifications, periarticular and vascular, are composed mainly of hydroxyapatite crystals, while the visceral calcification—heart, lung and skeletal muscles—are made of amorphous microcrystals of Ca, Mg, and P. Periarticular calcifications are usually painless, but may restrict joint movement due to their size. These lesions may regress with the control of serum phosphorus mainly by parathyroidectomy. The authors present an extremely advanced case of periarticular soft tissue calcification, demonstrated by bone scintigraphy and radiography.

*From the Department of Nuclear Medicine, Lady Davis Carmel Hospital, Haifa, Israel

†From the Department of Nephrology, Lady Davis Carmel Hospital, Haifa, Israel

© Lippincott-Raven Publishers.