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Standardization and Methodological Considerations for the Isometric Midthigh Pull

Comfort, Paul, PhD, CSCS*D1; Dos'Santos, Thomas, MSc1; Beckham, George K., PhD2; Stone, Michael H., PhD,CSCS*D3; Guppy, Stuart N., BSc4; Haff, G. Gregory, PhD, CSCS*D1,4

Strength & Conditioning Journal: April 2019 - Volume 41 - Issue 2 - p 57–79
doi: 10.1519/SSC.0000000000000433
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ABSTRACT THE ISOMETRIC MIDTHIGH PULL (IMTP) IS COMMONLY USED TO ASSESS AN ATHLETE'S FORCE GENERATION ABILITY. THIS TEST IS HIGHLY RELIABLE AND IS SIMPLE AND RELATIVELY QUICK TO PERFORM. THE DATA THAT CAN BE DETERMINED FROM THE FORCE–TIME CURVES GENERATED BY THE TEST HAVE BEEN SHOWN TO BE CLOSELY RELATED TO PERFORMANCE CAPACITIES IN A VARIETY OF DYNAMIC ATHLETIC TASKS. HOWEVER, WITHIN THE SCIENTIFIC LITERATURE, THERE ARE INCONSISTENCIES IN THE DATA COLLECTION PROCEDURES AND METHODS USED FOR DATA ANALYSIS THAT MAY IMPACT THE RESULTANT OUTPUT AND THE ABILITY TO COMPARE AND GENERALIZE RESULTS. THEREFORE, THE PRIMARY AIM OF THIS REVIEW IS TO IDENTIFY THE DIFFERENCES IN IMTP TESTING PROCEDURES AND DATA ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES, WHEREAS IDENTIFYING THE POTENTIAL IMPACT THIS MAY HAVE ON THE DATA COLLECTED. THE SECONDARY AIM IS TO PROVIDE RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE STANDARDIZATION OF TESTING PROCEDURES TO ENSURE THAT FUTURE IMTP DATA ARE OF MAXIMAL BENEFIT TO PRACTITIONERS AND RESEARCHERS. FOR A VIDEO ABSTRACT OF THIS ARTICLE, SEE SUPPLEMENTAL DIGITAL CONTENT 1 (SEE VIDEO, HTTP://LINKS.LWW.COM/SCJ/A249).

1Directorate of Sport, Exercise and Physiotherapy, University of Salford, Salford, Greater Manchester, United Kingdom;

2Kinesiology Department, California State University, Monterey Bay, Seaside, California;

3Department of Exercise and Sport Science, Center of Excellence for Sport Science and Coach Education, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, Tennessee; and

4Centre for Exercise and Sports Science Research, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Australia

Address correspondence to Dr. Paul Comfort, p.comfort@salford.ac.uk.

Supplemental digital content is available for this article. Direct URL citations appear in the printed text and are provided in the HTML and PDF versions of this article on the journal's Web site (http://journals.lww.com/nsca-scj).

Conflicts of Interest and Source of Funding: The authors report no conflicts of interest and no source of funding.

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Paul Comfortis a Reader in Strength and Conditioning and the programme leader for the Masters in Strength and Conditioning at the University of Salford.

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Tom Dos'Santosis a Doctoral student in Biomechanics and Strength and Conditioning at the University of Salford.

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George Beckhamis an assistant professor in the Kinesiology Department at California State University, Monterey Bay.

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Michael H. Stoneis Professor, Graduate Coordinator and Exercise and Sport Science Laboratory Director in the Department of Sport, Exercise, Recreation and Kinesiology at East Tennessee State University.

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Stuart Guppyis a Master's candidate in the area of Sports Science at Edith Cowan University.

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G. Gregory Haffis the Course Coordinator for the Masters of Exercise Science (Strength and Conditioning) at Edith Cowan University and served as the President of the National Strength and Conditioning Association from 2015-2018.

© 2019 by the National Strength & Conditioning Association