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Roman Chair Back Extension Is/Is Not a Safe and Effective Exercise?

Schoenfeld, Brad PhD, CSCS*D, NSCA-CPT*D, CSPS*D, FNSCA1; Kolber, Morey J. PT, PhD, CSCS*D2; Contreras, Bret PhD, CSCS3; Hanney, William J. DPT, PhD, ATC, CSCS*D4

Section Editor(s): Galpin, Andrew J. PhD, CSCS, NSCA-CPT

Strength & Conditioning Journal: June 2017 - Volume 39 - Issue 3 - p 42–45
doi: 10.1519/SSC.0000000000000284
Columns: Point/Counterpoint

ABSTRACT THE ROMAN CHAIR BACK EXTENSION EXERCISE IS PERFORMED WITH THE INTENT OF IMPROVING HIP AND SPINAL EXTENSOR MUSCLE PERFORMANCE. DESPITE EVIDENCE SUPPORTING THE AFOREMENTIONED BENEFITS, PERFORMANCE OF THIS EXERCISE MAY INCREASE THE RISK FOR LOW BACK PAIN AMONG CERTAIN POPULATION SUBGROUPS. ALTHOUGH A CLEAR VERDICT ON THE RISK-TO-BENEFIT RATIO REMAINS ELUSIVE, A DISCUSSION OF AVAILABLE SCIENTIFIC EVIDENCE (OR LACK THEREOF) SHOULD PROVIDE STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING PROFESSIONALS WITH INFORMATION NECESSARY FOR DECISION MAKING. WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU. VISIT NSCA-SCJ.COM TO WEIGH IN ON THE POINT/COUNTERPOINT QUICK POLL.

1Exercise Science, Human Performance Laboratory, Health Sciences Department, Lehman College, Bronx, New York;

2Department of Physical Therapy, Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, Florida; and Physical Department Therapy, Boca Raton Orthopaedic Group, Boca Raton, Florida;

3Auckland University of Technology, Sport Performance Research Institute New Zealand, Auckland, New Zealand; and

4Physical Therapy Program, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida

Address correspondence for point to Brad Schoenfeld, brad@workout911.com and for counterpoint to Morey J. Kolber, kolber@nova.edu.

Conflicts of Interest and Source of Funding: The authors report no conflicts of interest and no source of funding.

The purpose of the Point/Counterpoint Column is to provide a respectful and balanced discussion in relation to controversial or current topics in the fields of strength and conditioning, nutrition, and human performance.

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COLUMN EDITOR: Andrew J. Galpin, PhD, CSCS*D, NSCA-CPT*D

Brad Schoenfeld is an Assistant Professor in Exercise Science and Director of the Human Performance Laboratory at Lehman College.

Bret Contreras is an Assistant Professor in Exercise Science and Director of the Human Performance Laboratory at Auckland University of Technology, Sport Performance Research Institute New Zealand.

Morey J. Kolber is a Professor at Nova Southeastern University in the Department of Physical Therapy and the Director of Physical Therapy at Boca Raton Orthopaedic Group.

William J. Hanney is an Assistant Professor at the University of Central Florida Program in Physical Therapy.

© 2017 by the National Strength & Conditioning Association