Secondary Logo

Institutional members access full text with Ovid®

Share this article on:

Optimizing Squat Technique—Revisited

Comfort, Paul, PhD, CSCS*D1; McMahon, John J., PhD, CSCS1; Suchomel, Timothy J., PhD, CSCS*D2

Strength & Conditioning Journal: December 2018 - Volume 40 - Issue 6 - p 68–74
doi: 10.1519/SSC.0000000000000398
Article

ABSTRACT THE BACK SQUAT IS THE CORNERSTONE OF MANY STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING PROGRAMS, WITH INCREASES IN BACK SQUAT STRENGTH ASSOCIATED WITH IMPROVEMENTS IN ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE. A VARIETY OF BACK SQUAT TECHNIQUES HAVE BEEN DESCRIBED THROUGHOUT THE LITERATURE AND CAN BE OBSERVED ON SOCIAL MEDIA AND IN STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING FACILITIES, WITH NO CURRENT CONSENSUS REGARDING OPTIMAL TECHNIQUE. BASED ON CURRENTLY AVAILABLE EVIDENCE, A FULL DEPTH SQUAT, WITH A NATURAL FOOT POSITION, APPROXIMATELY SHOULDER-WIDTH APART, WITH UNRESTRICTED ANTERIOR MOVEMENT OF THE KNEES, AN UPRIGHT TRUNK, WITH A FORWARD AND UPWARD GAZE IS RECOMMENDED. THESE RECOMMENDATIONS SHOULD PERMIT INDIVIDUALIZATION BASED ON INDIVIDUAL ANTHROPOMETRICS. FOR A VIDEO ABSTRACT OF THIS ARTICLE, SEE SUPPLEMENTAL DIGITAL CONTENT 1 (SEE VIDEO, HTTP://LINKS.LWW.COM/SCJ/A241).

1Directorate of Sport, Exercise and Physiotherapy, University of Salford, Salford, Greater Manchester, United Kingdom; and

2Department of Human Movement Sciences, Carroll University, Waukesha, Wisconsin

Address correspondence to Dr. Paul Comfort, p.comfort@salford.ac.uk.

Conflicts of Interest and Source of Funding: The authors report no conflicts of interest and no source of funding.

Supplemental digital content is available for this article. Direct URL citations appear in the printed text and are provided in the HTML and PDF versions of this article on the journal's Web site (http://journals.lww.com/nsca-scj).

Figure

Figure

Paul Comfort is a Reader in Strength and Conditioning and the program leader for the Masters degree in Strength and Conditioning at the University of Salford.

Figure

Figure

John J. McMahon is a lecturer in Sports Biomechanics at the University of Salford.

Figure

Figure

Timothy J. Suchomel is an Assistant Professor at Carroll University, where he leads the Masters degree in Strength and Conditioning.

© 2018 by the National Strength & Conditioning Association