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Training Considerations for Individuals With Femoral Acetabular Impingement

Kolber, Morey J. PT, PhD, CSCS*D1; Cheatham, Scott W. PT, DPT, PhD(c), ATC, CSCS2; Hanney, William J. DPT, PhD, ATC, CSCS*D3; Otero, Eric BS, ATC, LAT1; Kreymer, Betsy ATC1; Salamh, Paul A. DPT, PhD4

Strength and Conditioning Journal: June 2015 - Volume 37 - Issue 3 - p 35–47
doi: 10.1519/SSC.0000000000000143
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ABSTRACT FEMORAL ACETABULAR IMPINGEMENT (FAI) IS A CONDITION WHEREBY INDIVIDUALS EXPERIENCE PAIN AND IMPAIRMENTS AS A RESULT OF ABNORMAL CONTACT BETWEEN THE ACETABULUM AND PROXIMAL FEMUR. THIS IS OFTEN CAUSED BY AN ABNORMALLY SHAPED FEMORAL HEAD OR ACETABULAR RIM. BECAUSE OF THIS STRUCTURAL ABNORMALITY, CERTAIN LOWER EXTREMITY EXERCISES MAY PERPETUATE SYMPTOMS OF FAI AS A RESULT OF POSITIONING. THE PURPOSE OF THIS ARTICLE IS TO PROVIDE INSIGHT INTO THE STRUCTURAL PATHOLOGY AND PROVOCATING FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH FAI. PRACTICAL EXERCISE-BASED MODIFICATIONS SPECIFIC TO FAI ARE PRESENTED IN AN EFFORT TO MITIGATE THE IMPAIRMENT SEQUELA AND PROMOTE PAIN-FREE TRAINING.

1Department of Physical Therapy, Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, Florida;

2California State University, Dominguez Hills, Carson, California;

3University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida; and

4Doctor of Physical Therapy Division, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina

Conflicts of Interest and Source of Funding: The authors report no conflicts of interest and no source of funding.

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Morey J. Kolberis an Associate Professor at Nova Southeastern University in the Department of Physical Therapy.

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Scott W. Cheathamis an Assistant Professor at California State University Dominguez Hills.

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William J. Hanneyis an Assistant Professor at the University of Central Florida.

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Eric Oterois a Doctoral Student at Nova Southeastern University in the Department of Physical Therapy.

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Betsy Kreymeris a Doctoral Student at Nova Southeastern University in the Department of Physical Therapy.

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Paul A. Salamhis the Faculty Development Resident in the Doctor of Physical Therapy Division at the Duke University School of Medicine.

© 2015 by the National Strength & Conditioning Association