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CAREY DANIEL
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research: November 2002
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ABSTRACTThe primary objective of this study was to assess the validity of the Conconi method of assessing anaerobic threshold (AT). Twenty-two competitive cyclists (11 men, 11 women) performed an incremental, maximal oxygen uptake (Vo2max) test on an electrically braked cycle ergometer. AT was assessed by a nonlinear increase in the carbon dioxide to oxygen consumption ratio (V-slope method). AT was also measured by a computer-assessed break point in heart rate from linearity (Conconi method). Mean values for heart rate at AT were 157.3 and 163.3 b·min-1 for the Conconi and V-slope methods, respectively. Although there was no significant difference (t = 1.07, p = 0.30) in the 2 methods, a rather low correlation coefficient (r = 0.458), high standard error of estimate (SEE = 10.7 b·min-1), and high total error (TE = 16.7 b·min1) would preclude the use of the Conconi method as a practical tool for assessing AT.

The primary objective of this study was to assess the validity of the Conconi method of assessing anaerobic threshold (AT). Twenty-two competitive cyclists (11 men, 11 women) performed an incremental, maximal oxygen uptake (Vo2max) test on an electrically braked cycle ergometer. AT was assessed by a nonlinear increase in the carbon dioxide to oxygen consumption ratio (V-slope method). AT was also measured by a computer-assessed break point in heart rate from linearity (Conconi method). Mean values for heart rate at AT were 157.3 and 163.3 b·min-1 for the Conconi and V-slope methods, respectively. Although there was no significant difference (t = 1.07, p = 0.30) in the 2 methods, a rather low correlation coefficient (r = 0.458), high standard error of estimate (SEE = 10.7 b·min-1), and high total error (TE = 16.7 b·min1) would preclude the use of the Conconi method as a practical tool for assessing AT.

© 2002 National Strength and Conditioning Association