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BRENNER MEGAN; RANKIN, JANET WALBERG; SEBOLT, DON
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research: May 2000
Original Article: PDF Only

ABSTRACTSixteen collegiate women lacrosse players consumed either creatine (C, n = 7) or a placebo (P, n = 9) for 5 weeks during their preseason conditioning program (20 g · d−1 for 1 week and 2 g · d−1 for 4 weeks). Pre-and posttesting consisted of body composition, muscle endurance test, blood lactate response to the endurance test, 1 repetition maximum (1RM) bench press and leg extension, and blood glutamyltransferase (GGL) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN). Testing revealed that 1RM bench press significantly increased in both groups, with the C group improving significantly more than the P group (6.2 ± 2.0 and 2.8 ± 1.8 kg). Percent body fat by skin-fold decreased significantly more in C than the P group (-1.2 ± 0.9 and 0.3 ± 0.8), but was not different by group by hydrodensitometry. No significant differences between groups were found for all other measures, but significant time effects were noted for body weight gain (0.5 ± 3.2 kg), 1RM leg extension (1.4 ± 4.1 kg), BUN (0.07 ± 0.03 mmol · L−1), total work during the muscle endurance test (283.5 ± 387.3 watts), and fat-free mass by skinfold (0.7 ± 1.2 kg). In summary, a regime of dietary creatine supplementation significantly improved upper-body strength gain and decreased the percent body fat as assessed by skinfold in women athletes engaged in a resistance-training program.

Sixteen collegiate women lacrosse players consumed either creatine (C, n = 7) or a placebo (P, n = 9) for 5 weeks during their preseason conditioning program (20 g · d−1 for 1 week and 2 g · d−1 for 4 weeks). Pre-and posttesting consisted of body composition, muscle endurance test, blood lactate response to the endurance test, 1 repetition maximum (1RM) bench press and leg extension, and blood glutamyltransferase (GGL) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN). Testing revealed that 1RM bench press significantly increased in both groups, with the C group improving significantly more than the P group (6.2 ± 2.0 and 2.8 ± 1.8 kg). Percent body fat by skin-fold decreased significantly more in C than the P group (-1.2 ± 0.9 and 0.3 ± 0.8), but was not different by group by hydrodensitometry. No significant differences between groups were found for all other measures, but significant time effects were noted for body weight gain (0.5 ± 3.2 kg), 1RM leg extension (1.4 ± 4.1 kg), BUN (0.07 ± 0.03 mmol · L−1), total work during the muscle endurance test (283.5 ± 387.3 watts), and fat-free mass by skinfold (0.7 ± 1.2 kg). In summary, a regime of dietary creatine supplementation significantly improved upper-body strength gain and decreased the percent body fat as assessed by skinfold in women athletes engaged in a resistance-training program.

© 2000 National Strength and Conditioning Association