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Schiotz Matthew K.; Potteiger, Jeffrey A.; Huntsinger, Phillip G.; Donald C. Denmark, Lt. Col.
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research: August 1998
Original Article: PDF Only

ABSTRACTThis study examined the effects of manipulating training intensity on strength, body composition, and performance in trained ROTC cadets. Fourteen male ROTC cadets were pre-and posttested for % body fat and 1-RM strength on the bench press and parallel squat. Performance was measured via the physical fitness components of the Army Ranger Challenge and consisted of push-ups, sit-ups, 2-mile run, and 10-km ruck-run. Subjects were matched according to military experience and randomly assigned to a periodized model or a constant-intensity model for 10 weeks of resistance training. Total training volume was equal between groups. The periodized group significantly increased in 1-RM bench press, 1-RM parallel squat, and push-ups, and significantly decreased % fat and ruck-run time. The constant-intensity group significantly increased 1-RM parallel squat and push-ups, and significantly decreased their 2-mile run and ruck-run time. The periodized group completed the ruck-run significantly faster than the constant-intensity group. The results indicate that following a 10-week training cycle with trained subjects, significant improvements in body composition, strength, and performance can be obtained using two different training programs that have equal total relative training volume.

This study examined the effects of manipulating training intensity on strength, body composition, and performance in trained ROTC cadets. Fourteen male ROTC cadets were pre-and posttested for % body fat and 1-RM strength on the bench press and parallel squat. Performance was measured via the physical fitness components of the Army Ranger Challenge and consisted of push-ups, sit-ups, 2-mile run, and 10-km ruck-run. Subjects were matched according to military experience and randomly assigned to a periodized model or a constant-intensity model for 10 weeks of resistance training. Total training volume was equal between groups. The periodized group significantly increased in 1-RM bench press, 1-RM parallel squat, and push-ups, and significantly decreased % fat and ruck-run time. The constant-intensity group significantly increased 1-RM parallel squat and push-ups, and significantly decreased their 2-mile run and ruck-run time. The periodized group completed the ruck-run significantly faster than the constant-intensity group. The results indicate that following a 10-week training cycle with trained subjects, significant improvements in body composition, strength, and performance can be obtained using two different training programs that have equal total relative training volume.

© 1998 National Strength and Conditioning Association