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Bailey Mark L.; Khodiguian, Nazareth; Farrar, Peggy A.
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research: May 1996
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ABSTRACTThe effects of weight training (WT) on the responses to aerobic exercise (AE) were studied in 11 subjects in a counterbalanced, repeated measures design. In the control sessions, subjects engaged in 20 min of AE on a cycle ergometer at 60% of their VJOURNAL/jscr/04.02/00124278-199605000-00008/ENTITY_OV0312/v/2017-07-20T235157Z/r/image-pngO2, max. Heart rate, blood pressure, RPE, and core temperature were assessed 10 min into the exercise and again during the final 30 sec. Mean blood pressure (MBP) and rate-pressure product (RPP) were calculated later. In the experimental sessions, subjects undertook a standard 50-min WT program working all major muscle groups; after 15 min of recovery, data were obtained from an AE bout identical to that used in the control session. At 10 min, HR, MBP, and RPP were significantly higher when AE was preceded by WT. When measured during the last 30 set of exercise, HR, RPE, and RPP differed significantly. The inclusion of WT shortly before AE apparently affected subject responses to AE, possibly causing a shift in the slope of the HR-JOURNAL/jscr/04.02/00124278-199605000-00008/ENTITY_OV0312/v/2017-07-20T235157Z/r/image-pngO2 relationship.

The effects of weight training (WT) on the responses to aerobic exercise (AE) were studied in 11 subjects in a counterbalanced, repeated measures design. In the control sessions, subjects engaged in 20 min of AE on a cycle ergometer at 60% of their VJOURNAL/jscr/04.02/00124278-199605000-00008/ENTITY_OV0312/v/2017-07-20T235157Z/r/image-pngO2, max. Heart rate, blood pressure, RPE, and core temperature were assessed 10 min into the exercise and again during the final 30 sec. Mean blood pressure (MBP) and rate-pressure product (RPP) were calculated later. In the experimental sessions, subjects undertook a standard 50-min WT program working all major muscle groups; after 15 min of recovery, data were obtained from an AE bout identical to that used in the control session. At 10 min, HR, MBP, and RPP were significantly higher when AE was preceded by WT. When measured during the last 30 set of exercise, HR, RPE, and RPP differed significantly. The inclusion of WT shortly before AE apparently affected subject responses to AE, possibly causing a shift in the slope of the HR-JOURNAL/jscr/04.02/00124278-199605000-00008/ENTITY_OV0312/v/2017-07-20T235157Z/r/image-pngO2 relationship.

© 1996 National Strength and Conditioning Association