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Sedlock Darlene A.
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research: February 1992
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ABSTRACTThis study was designed to examine the effect of two exercise modes on the magnitude and duration of excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC). Seven moderately trained men reported to the laboratory on two occasions and rested, seated, for one hour. Baseline JOURNAL/jscr/04.02/00124278-199202000-00004/ENTITY_OV0312/v/2017-07-20T235126Z/r/image-pngO2 and heart rate (HR) were measured during the last 10 minutes of this period. Exercise duration was 30 minutes at an intensity approximating 60 to 65 percent of each subject's previously determined mode- specific peak JOURNAL/jscr/04.02/00124278-199202000-00004/ENTITY_OV0312/v/2017-07-20T235126Z/r/image-pngO2 using a cycle ergometer or a motor-driven treadmill, administered in a counterbalanced order. After the exercise, subjects again rested while JOURNAL/jscr/04.02/00124278-199202000-00004/ENTITY_OV0312/v/2017-07-20T235126Z/r/image-pngO2 and HR were measured continuously, until baseline JOURNAL/jscr/04.02/00124278-199202000-00004/ENTITY_OV0312/v/2017-07-20T235126Z/r/image-pngO2 was achieved. No significant diflerence in duration of EPOC between the two exercise modes was noted. Magnitude of EPOC was small and averaged 15 to 17 kilocalories. It was concluded that moderate-intensity treadmill and cycle ergometer exercise at an equivalent relative metabolic load elicits similar post-exercise responses, and that mode of exercise is not a contributing factor to the discrepant findings in the EPOC literature.

This study was designed to examine the effect of two exercise modes on the magnitude and duration of excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC). Seven moderately trained men reported to the laboratory on two occasions and rested, seated, for one hour. Baseline JOURNAL/jscr/04.02/00124278-199202000-00004/ENTITY_OV0312/v/2017-07-20T235126Z/r/image-pngO2 and heart rate (HR) were measured during the last 10 minutes of this period. Exercise duration was 30 minutes at an intensity approximating 60 to 65 percent of each subject's previously determined mode- specific peak JOURNAL/jscr/04.02/00124278-199202000-00004/ENTITY_OV0312/v/2017-07-20T235126Z/r/image-pngO2 using a cycle ergometer or a motor-driven treadmill, administered in a counterbalanced order. After the exercise, subjects again rested while JOURNAL/jscr/04.02/00124278-199202000-00004/ENTITY_OV0312/v/2017-07-20T235126Z/r/image-pngO2 and HR were measured continuously, until baseline JOURNAL/jscr/04.02/00124278-199202000-00004/ENTITY_OV0312/v/2017-07-20T235126Z/r/image-pngO2 was achieved. No significant diflerence in duration of EPOC between the two exercise modes was noted. Magnitude of EPOC was small and averaged 15 to 17 kilocalories. It was concluded that moderate-intensity treadmill and cycle ergometer exercise at an equivalent relative metabolic load elicits similar post-exercise responses, and that mode of exercise is not a contributing factor to the discrepant findings in the EPOC literature.

© 1992 National Strength and Conditioning Association