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Can Resistance Training Enhance the Rapid Force Development in Unloaded Dynamic Isoinertial Multi-Joint Movements? A Systematic Review

Van Hooren, Bas1; Bosch, Frans1; Meijer, Kenneth2

Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research: August 2017 - Volume 31 - Issue 8 - p 2324–2337
doi: 10.1519/JSC.0000000000001916
Brief Review

Van Hooren, B, Bosch, F, and Meijer, K. Can resistance training enhance the rapid force development in unloaded dynamic isoinertial multi-joint movements? A systematic review. J Strength Cond Res 31(8): 2324–2337, 2017—The objectives of this systematic review were to (a) evaluate whether resistance training can improve the rapid force development in unloaded dynamic isoinertial multi-joint movements and (b) investigate whether these effects differ between untrained/recreationally trained and well-trained individuals. Four electronic databases were screened for studies that measured the effects of resistance training on rapid force development in unloaded dynamic isoinertial multi-joint movements. Twelve studies with a total of 271 participants were included. 10/26 (38%) and 6/14 (43%) of the measures of rapid force development in unloaded dynamic isoinertial multi-joint movements significantly improved following training in the untrained/recreationally trained and well-trained individuals, respectively. Additionally, 7/14 (50%) and 3/12 (25%) of the measures significantly improved during a countermovement and squat jump in the untrained/recreationally trained individuals and 4/6 (67%) and 2/8 (25%) significantly improved during a countermovement and squat jump in the well-trained individuals, respectively. These findings indicate that resistance training has a limited transfer to rapid force development in unloaded dynamic isoinertial multi-joint movements, especially for well-trained individuals and in movements without a countermovement. Furthermore, rapid force development has likely a limited transfer from movements with countermovement to movements without a countermovement and from bilateral movements to unilateral movements. Therefore, it is important to specifically mimic the actual sport movement in order to maximize the transfer of training and testing.

1Institute of Sports, Fontys University of Applied Sciences, Eindhoven, the Netherlands; and

2Department of Human Movement Sciences, NUTRIM School of Nutrition and Translational Research in Metabolism, Maastricht University Medical Center+, Maastricht, the Netherlands

Address correspondence to Bas Van Hooren, basvanhooren@hotmail.com.

Copyright © 2017 by the National Strength & Conditioning Association.