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Impact of Strength Training on Bone Mineral Density in Patients Infected With HIV Exhibiting Lipodystrophy

Santos, Wlaldemir R.1; Santos, Walmir R.2; Paes, Pedro P.1,3; Ferreira-Silva, Isac A.2; Santos, André P.4; Vercese, Natan1; Machado, Dalmo R.L.2; de Paula, Francisco José A.4; Donadi, Eduardo A.4; Navarro, Anderson M.4; Fernandes, Ana Paula M.1

Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research: December 2015 - Volume 29 - Issue 12 - p 3466–3471
doi: 10.1519/JSC.0000000000001001
Original Research

Santos, WR, Santos, WR, Paes, PP, Ferreira-Silva, IA, Santos, AP, Vercese, N, Machado, DRL, de Paula, FJA, Donadi, EA, Navarro, AM, and Fernandes, APM. Impact of strength training on bone mineral density in patients infected with HIV exhibiting lipodystrophy. J Strength Cond Res 29(12): 3466–3471, 2015—This study aimed to evaluate the impact of strength training on bone mineral density (BMD) in individuals harboring HIV exhibiting lipodystrophy. The study included 20 subjects (16 men) aged 50.60 ± 6.40 years with reduced BMD, presenting positive serology for HIV, using highly active antiretroviral therapy, and performing no regular practice of physical exercise before being enrolled in the study. Bone mineral density levels were evaluated by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry in the lumbar spine, femoral neck, and 1/3 radius, before and after 36 sessions (12 weeks) of strength training. Compared with pre-exercise period, the results showed increased BMD in lumbar spine (3.28%; p = 0.012), femoral neck (8.45%; p = 0.044), and 1/3 radius (5.41%; p = 0.035). This is the first study evaluating the impact of strength training in patients living with HIV and exhibiting lipodystrophy, showing an increased BMD in all the regions measured (lumbar spine, femoral neck, and 1/3 radius). This study showed the beneficial impact of the strength training on BMD increase in patients living with HIV as an effective and available approach to improve bone health.

1Department of General and Specialized Nursing, Nursing School of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil;

2School of Physical Education and Sport of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil;

3Department Physical Education, Health Sciences Center, Federal University of Pernambuco, Recife, Brazil; and

4Department of Medical Clinical, Faculty of Medicine of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil

Address correspondence to Ana Paula M. Fernandes, anapaula@eerp.usp.br.

Copyright © 2015 by the National Strength & Conditioning Association.