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Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research: January 2010 - Volume 24 - Issue - p 1
doi: 10.1097/01.JSC.0000367216.33408.0c
Abstract
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To investigate the relationship between static strength, rotational strength, rotational power, bat speed and batted-ball velocity of NCAA Division I baseball players. Thirty-three NCAA Division I male baseball players (age 20.36 +/- 1.41 yrs.) were studied to determine static strength, rotational strength, rotational power, bat speed, and batted-ball velocity. Static strength (SS = 68.4 +/- 12.83 lb.) was measured by a cable tensiometer at the contact point (bat and ball) in a static hitting position. The maximum of three trials was recorded. Rotational strength (RS = 194.39 +/- 21.46 lbs.) was measured by a 1RM on a Cybex Torso Rotational Machine. Rotational power (RP = 21.09 +/- 1.11 mph) was measured by a Stalker Pro digital sports radar gun during a rotational medicine ball toss using a 3 kg medicine ball. Bat speed (BS = 84.4 mph +/- 5.87 mph) was measured with the ATEC 2000® Bat Speed Chronograph by recording the maximum result of five swings on a batting tee. Batted-ball velocity (BBV = 82.00 +/- 5.28 mph) was measured with the Stalker Pro digital sports radar gun by recording the maximum velocity of five batted balls from a batting tee. Height (HT = 72.19 +/- 2.66 in.) was measured to the nearest half-inch and body weight (BW = 201.88 +/- 27.41 lb.) to the nearest pound. The three-site skin fold test was used to determine percent body fat (%BF = 12.89 +/- 3.94) and lean body mass (LBM = 173.2 +/- 21.1 lb.). Data analysis was performed on the raw data by utilizing a correlation matrix to calculate correlation coefficients for all variables. Statistical analyses (p < .05) indicated moderate to high positive relationships between static strength and bat speed (r = .58) and static strength and batted-ball velocity (r = .62). Additional moderate positive relationships existed for rotational strength and bat speed (r = .41), rotational strength and batted-ball velocity speed (r = .43), rotational power and bat speed (r = .36), and rotational power and batted-ball velocity (r = .43). The results of this study indicate that a significant relationship existed among static strength, rotational strength, rotational power, bat speed and batted-ball velocity. Baseball coaches, players, and trainers should consider the relationship of static strength, rotational strength, and rotational power, when training for bat speed and batted-ball velocity. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: This study was funded by a grant from the Center for Educational Development, Evaluation, and Research (CEDER) at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi.

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