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The Effect Of Music Listening On Running Performance And Rating Of Percieved Exertion Of College Students

Bonnette, Randy; Smith, Morgan C III; Spaniol, Frank; Melrose, Don; Ocker, Liette

The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research: January 2010 - Volume 24 - Issue - p 1
doi: 10.1097/01.JSC.0000367073.45565.4b
Abstract

To investigate the effect listening of music has on running performance and rating of perceived exertion of college students. Twenty-eight undergraduate kinesiology students (17 males, 11 females; age = 22.9 +/−5.9 yrs) were studied to determine if running performance and rating of perceived exertion were affected by listening to music. Running performance (RP) was measured by a 1.5mile run. Two trials were performed, the first was a running performance without music listening (RPWOML = 12.94 +/−3.35 min) and the second trial was a running performance while music listening (RPWML = 12.50+/−2.48 min). The second trial was measured five days post the initial trial. Listening to music (music listening) was defined as the subject's self selection of music tracks and use of a personal digital audio player (eg., Ipod and MP3) during exercise. Perceived exertion without music listening (PE-WOML = 14.7+/−1.3) and perceived exertion with music listening (PEWML = 15.2+/−2.4) was measured by the Borg 6 to 20 RPE scale. Data analysis was performed on the raw data by utilizing dependent t-tests to calculate and compare sample means. Statistical analyses determined a significant difference (p < .05) between running performance without music listening (RPWOML = 12.94+/−3.35 min) and running performance with music listening (RPWML = 12.50 +/−2.48 min). However, no significant difference (p < .05) was determined between perceived exertion without music listening (PEWOML = 14.7+/−1.3) and perceived exertion with music listening (PEWML = 15.2 +/−2.4) as measured by the Borg 6 to 20 RPE scale. The results of this study indicate that music listening has a significant effect on running performance during a maximal 1.5 mile run. However, music listening had no significant effect on rating of perceived exertion during a maximal 1.5 mile run. Coaches, athletes, and traditional exercisers should consider music listening to enhance aerobic running performance.

© 2010 National Strength and Conditioning Association