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CAÑETE SILVIA; SAN JUAN, ALEJANDRO F.; PÉREZ, MARGARITA; GÓMEZ-GALLEGO, FÉLIX; LÓPEZ-MOJARES, LUIS M.; EARNEST, CONRAD P.; FLECK, STEVEN J.; LUCIA, ALEJANDRO
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research: February 2006
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ABSTRACTThe purpose of this study was to determine the effects of shortterm (7 days) oral creatine supplementation (0.3 g·kg−1) in elderly women during exercise tests that reflect functional capacity during daily living tasks. We assessed several indices of endurance capacity (1-mile walk test, gross mechanical efficiency, ventilatory threshold, and peak oxygen intake determined during cycle-ergometry) and lower-extremity functional performance (time to complete sit-stand test). Subjects were assigned to a creatine (n = 10; age 67 ± 6 years) or placebo (n = 6; age 68 ± 4 years) group. We found a significant improvement only after creatine loading in the sit-stand test (placebo: 9.7 ± 0.9 seconds for pretest and 9.3 ± 0.7 seconds for posttest, p > 0.05; creatine: 10.0 ± 0.7 seconds for pretest and 8.8 ± 1.1 seconds for posttest). Significance was recorded at p < 0.05 for the interaction effect (group [creatine, placebo] 3 time [pretest, post-test]). In elderly women, short-term oral creatine supplementation does not improve endurance capacity but increases the ability to perform lower-body functional living tasks involving rapid movements.

The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of shortterm (7 days) oral creatine supplementation (0.3 g·kg−1) in elderly women during exercise tests that reflect functional capacity during daily living tasks. We assessed several indices of endurance capacity (1-mile walk test, gross mechanical efficiency, ventilatory threshold, and peak oxygen intake determined during cycle-ergometry) and lower-extremity functional performance (time to complete sit-stand test). Subjects were assigned to a creatine (n = 10; age 67 ± 6 years) or placebo (n = 6; age 68 ± 4 years) group. We found a significant improvement only after creatine loading in the sit-stand test (placebo: 9.7 ± 0.9 seconds for pretest and 9.3 ± 0.7 seconds for posttest, p > 0.05; creatine: 10.0 ± 0.7 seconds for pretest and 8.8 ± 1.1 seconds for posttest). Significance was recorded at p < 0.05 for the interaction effect (group [creatine, placebo] 3 time [pretest, post-test]). In elderly women, short-term oral creatine supplementation does not improve endurance capacity but increases the ability to perform lower-body functional living tasks involving rapid movements.

Address correspondence to Alejandro Luća, M.D., Ph.D., alejandro.lucia@uem.es.

© 2006 National Strength and Conditioning Association