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EFFECT OF ECCENTRIC STRENGTH TESTING ON DELAYED-ONSET MUSCLE PAIN

DANNECKER ERIN A.; O'CONNOR, PATRICK D.; ATCHISON, JAMES W.; ROBINSON, MICHAEL E.
The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research: November 2005
ORIGINAL RESEARCH: PDF Only

ABSTRACTDannecker, E.A., P.D. O'Connor, J.W. Atchison, and M.E. Robinson. Effect of eccentric strength testing on delayedonset muscle pain. J. Strength Cond. Res. 19(4):888–892. 2005.—This investigation was designed to determine the effect of eccentric strength testing on delayed-onset muscle pain in 20 untrained university students. Initially, eccentric strength testing (5-repetition maximum [5RM]) was performed bilaterally. Next, 1 arm completed 3 sets of 10 eccentric repetitions to induce delayed-onset muscle pain. Then, in a subsequent session, whichever arm previously performed only the 5RM test completed the 5RM test a second time and the 3 sets of 10 eccentric repetitions. Statistical analyses supported significantly increased pain intensity and unpleasantness across 48 hours post-5RM test alone. However, pain intensity and unpleasantness after the eccentric training bouts were significantly lower in the arm that performed 2 5RM tests than the arm that performed only 1. Thus, the eccentric strength testing produced delayed-onset muscle pain and protected against future delayed-onset muscle pain. These effects should be considered when such testing is used in baseline strength assessments.

Dannecker, E.A., P.D. O'Connor, J.W. Atchison, and M.E. Robinson. Effect of eccentric strength testing on delayedonset muscle pain. J. Strength Cond. Res. 19(4):888–892. 2005.—This investigation was designed to determine the effect of eccentric strength testing on delayed-onset muscle pain in 20 untrained university students. Initially, eccentric strength testing (5-repetition maximum [5RM]) was performed bilaterally. Next, 1 arm completed 3 sets of 10 eccentric repetitions to induce delayed-onset muscle pain. Then, in a subsequent session, whichever arm previously performed only the 5RM test completed the 5RM test a second time and the 3 sets of 10 eccentric repetitions. Statistical analyses supported significantly increased pain intensity and unpleasantness across 48 hours post-5RM test alone. However, pain intensity and unpleasantness after the eccentric training bouts were significantly lower in the arm that performed 2 5RM tests than the arm that performed only 1. Thus, the eccentric strength testing produced delayed-onset muscle pain and protected against future delayed-onset muscle pain. These effects should be considered when such testing is used in baseline strength assessments.

Address correspondence to Dr. Erin A. Dannecker, danneckere@missouri.edu.

© 2005 National Strength and Conditioning Association