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DALLECK LANCE C.; VELLA, CHANTAL A.; KRAVITZ, LEN; ROBERGS, ROBERT A.
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research: August 2005
ORIGINAL RESEARCH: PDF Only
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ABSTRACTThe purpose of this study was to examine the accuracy of the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) walking equation at low walking speeds, altitude (1,550 m), and higher grades. Twenty men and women (mean ± SD, age, 28 ± 6 years; height, 171 ± 13 cm; weight, 67.8 ± 18.1 kg) completed 2 randomized testing sessions under altitude (AL) (PIO2 = 123.1 mm Hg [20.93%]) and sea level control (SLC) (PIO2 = 147.3 mm Hg [25.00%]) conditions. Steady-state oxygen uptake (VO2) was measured while subjects walked at 50 m·min-1 at 8 separate grades (0, 5, 10, 15, 18, 21, 24, and 27%). Steady-state VO2 measurements from the last 2 minutes of each grade in AL and SLC were compared to the predicted VO2 of each grade according to the ACSM walking equation. Mean VO2 differences between predicted and AL values ranged from 20.5 to 1.4 ml·kg21·min-1, averaged 20.1 ml·kg-1·min-1 across all grades, and were significant (p < 0.05) at 0 percent grade. Mean VO2 differences between predicted and SLC values ranged from 0.6 to 3.0 ml·kg-1·min-1, averaged 1.4 ml·kg-1·min-1 across all grades, and were statistically significant (p < 0.05) at 0 and 5 percent. The standard error of the estimate (SEE) for the prediction of VO2 under AL and SLC were 2.2 and 2.0 ml·kg-1·min-1, respectively. Total errors for the prediction of VO2max under AL and SLC were 2.3 and 2.6 ml·kg-1·min-1, respectively. Overall, the findings indicate that the current ACSM prediction equation for walking is appropriate for application at low speeds, moderate altitude, and higher grades.

The purpose of this study was to examine the accuracy of the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) walking equation at low walking speeds, altitude (1,550 m), and higher grades. Twenty men and women (mean ± SD, age, 28 ± 6 years; height, 171 ± 13 cm; weight, 67.8 ± 18.1 kg) completed 2 randomized testing sessions under altitude (AL) (PIO2 = 123.1 mm Hg [20.93%]) and sea level control (SLC) (PIO2 = 147.3 mm Hg [25.00%]) conditions. Steady-state oxygen uptake (VO2) was measured while subjects walked at 50 m·min-1 at 8 separate grades (0, 5, 10, 15, 18, 21, 24, and 27%). Steady-state VO2 measurements from the last 2 minutes of each grade in AL and SLC were compared to the predicted VO2 of each grade according to the ACSM walking equation. Mean VO2 differences between predicted and AL values ranged from 20.5 to 1.4 ml·kg21·min-1, averaged 20.1 ml·kg-1·min-1 across all grades, and were significant (p < 0.05) at 0 percent grade. Mean VO2 differences between predicted and SLC values ranged from 0.6 to 3.0 ml·kg-1·min-1, averaged 1.4 ml·kg-1·min-1 across all grades, and were statistically significant (p < 0.05) at 0 and 5 percent. The standard error of the estimate (SEE) for the prediction of VO2 under AL and SLC were 2.2 and 2.0 ml·kg-1·min-1, respectively. Total errors for the prediction of VO2max under AL and SLC were 2.3 and 2.6 ml·kg-1·min-1, respectively. Overall, the findings indicate that the current ACSM prediction equation for walking is appropriate for application at low speeds, moderate altitude, and higher grades.

Address correspondence to Dr. Lance Dalleck, ldalleck@newheart.nm.org.

© 2005 National Strength and Conditioning Association