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THOMAS DAVID Q.; LUMPP, SAMANTHA A.; SCHREIBER, JAMEE A.; KEITH, JAMES A.
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research: November 2004
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ABSTRACTOne role of Army Reserved Officer's Training Corps (ROTC) programs is to physically prepare cadets for the demands of a military career. Cadets participate in physical training 3 days per week as part of their military science curriculum. Limited research has been conducted on the fitness level of ROTC cadets; therefore, the purpose of this study was to profile the physical fitness status of a cadre of ROTC cadets. Forty-three cadets (30 men and 13 women) performed Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT) assessments (2-mile run, 2-minute maximum push-ups and sit-ups) and clinical assessments of fitness (Bruce protocol VO2max, underwater weighing, and 1 repetition maximum [1RM] bench press tests). Mean 6 standard deviations were calculated to provide the physical fitness profile for each parameter. Male cadets (21 ± 2.2 years; height 177.4 ± 6.6 cm; mass 79.2 ± 9.4 kg) scored 49.6 ± 6.1 ml·kg−1·min−1 for VO2max, 14.8 ± 4.2% fat, 86.5 ± 24.9 kg 1RM bench press, 2-mile run of 13.97 ± 1.4 minutes, 70.5 ± 12.8 situps, and 60.2 ± 13.2 push-ups. Female cadets (20 ± 2.4 years; height 165.1 ± 8.0 cm; mass 63.5 ± 10.0 kg) scored 40.8 ± 3.9 ml·kg−1·min−1 for VO2 max, 23.9 ± 3.8% fat, 35.3 ± 8.2 kg 1RM bench press, 2-mile run of 17.0 ± 1.6 minutes, 65.0 ± 12.9 situps, and 33.3 ± 11.2 push-ups. The mean scores were above the 83rd percentile on all APFT items and average (percent fat) to above average (VO2max and men's bench press scores) when compared with peer-age and sex-corrected norms. Only the women's bench press score was below average. With the exception of the women's bench press, these ROTC cadets possessed average to above average levels of fitness.

One role of Army Reserved Officer's Training Corps (ROTC) programs is to physically prepare cadets for the demands of a military career. Cadets participate in physical training 3 days per week as part of their military science curriculum. Limited research has been conducted on the fitness level of ROTC cadets; therefore, the purpose of this study was to profile the physical fitness status of a cadre of ROTC cadets. Forty-three cadets (30 men and 13 women) performed Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT) assessments (2-mile run, 2-minute maximum push-ups and sit-ups) and clinical assessments of fitness (Bruce protocol VO2max, underwater weighing, and 1 repetition maximum [1RM] bench press tests). Mean 6 standard deviations were calculated to provide the physical fitness profile for each parameter. Male cadets (21 ± 2.2 years; height 177.4 ± 6.6 cm; mass 79.2 ± 9.4 kg) scored 49.6 ± 6.1 ml·kg−1·min−1 for VO2max, 14.8 ± 4.2% fat, 86.5 ± 24.9 kg 1RM bench press, 2-mile run of 13.97 ± 1.4 minutes, 70.5 ± 12.8 situps, and 60.2 ± 13.2 push-ups. Female cadets (20 ± 2.4 years; height 165.1 ± 8.0 cm; mass 63.5 ± 10.0 kg) scored 40.8 ± 3.9 ml·kg−1·min−1 for VO2 max, 23.9 ± 3.8% fat, 35.3 ± 8.2 kg 1RM bench press, 2-mile run of 17.0 ± 1.6 minutes, 65.0 ± 12.9 situps, and 33.3 ± 11.2 push-ups. The mean scores were above the 83rd percentile on all APFT items and average (percent fat) to above average (VO2max and men's bench press scores) when compared with peer-age and sex-corrected norms. Only the women's bench press score was below average. With the exception of the women's bench press, these ROTC cadets possessed average to above average levels of fitness.

Address correspondence to Dr. David Q. Thomas, dqthoma@ilstu.edu.

© 2004 National Strength and Conditioning Association