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HOFFMAN JAY R.; WENDELL, MICHAEL; COOPER, JOSHUA; KANG, JIE
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research: August 2003
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ABSTRACTThe purpose of this study was to compare linear (LT) with nonlinear (NL) in-season training programs in freshman football players during the course of 2 separate seasons. During the first year (n = 14, mean ± SD = 177.3 ± 4.8 cm, 88.0 ± 9.7 kg), the LT program was employed 2 days per week. In the second year (n = 14, 175.0 ± 7.1 cm, 94.2 ± 20.5 kg), a 2 days per week LT was used. Subjects were tested for maximal strength in the squat (1 repetition maximum [1RM]) and bench press (1RM) exercises. A significant improvement in 1RM squat was seen in LT, but not in NL. No significant improvement in 1RM bench press was seen in either group. A significant difference between LT and NL was observed in A1RM squat (13.8 ± 7.4 kg compared with 1.6 ± 2.6 kg, respectively). Results of this study suggest that LT may be more effective in eliciting strength gains than NL in freshman football players during an in-season training program.

The purpose of this study was to compare linear (LT) with nonlinear (NL) in-season training programs in freshman football players during the course of 2 separate seasons. During the first year (n = 14, mean ± SD = 177.3 ± 4.8 cm, 88.0 ± 9.7 kg), the LT program was employed 2 days per week. In the second year (n = 14, 175.0 ± 7.1 cm, 94.2 ± 20.5 kg), a 2 days per week LT was used. Subjects were tested for maximal strength in the squat (1 repetition maximum [1RM]) and bench press (1RM) exercises. A significant improvement in 1RM squat was seen in LT, but not in NL. No significant improvement in 1RM bench press was seen in either group. A significant difference between LT and NL was observed in A1RM squat (13.8 ± 7.4 kg compared with 1.6 ± 2.6 kg, respectively). Results of this study suggest that LT may be more effective in eliciting strength gains than NL in freshman football players during an in-season training program.

© 2003 National Strength and Conditioning Association