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WHITE LESLEY J.; DRESSENDORFER, RUDOLPH H.; MULLER, SUSAN M.; FERGUSON, MICHAEL A.
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research: May 2003
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ABSTRACTThe purpose of this study was to examine whether substituting 50% of run training volume with cycling (‘’cross-training‘’) would maintain 3,000-m race time and estimated Vo2max in competitive female distance runners during a 5-week recuperative phase. Eleven collegiate runners were randomly assigned to either the run training-only (R) group (n = 6) or the cycle training (R/C) group (n = 5), which cross-trained on alternate days. The groups trained daily at a reduced intensity (75–80% of maximum heart rate). Training volume was similar to the competitive season (40–50 mi·wk−1) except that cycling represented 50% of volume for the R/C group. On follow-up, 3,000-m time was 1.4% (9 seconds) slower in the R group and 3.4% (22 seconds) slower in the R/C group. No important change in estimated Vo2max was found for either group. It was concluded that cycle cross-training adequately maintained aerobic performance during the recuperative phase between the crosscountry and track seasons, comparable to the primary sport of running.

The purpose of this study was to examine whether substituting 50% of run training volume with cycling (‘’cross-training‘’) would maintain 3,000-m race time and estimated Vo2max in competitive female distance runners during a 5-week recuperative phase. Eleven collegiate runners were randomly assigned to either the run training-only (R) group (n = 6) or the cycle training (R/C) group (n = 5), which cross-trained on alternate days. The groups trained daily at a reduced intensity (75–80% of maximum heart rate). Training volume was similar to the competitive season (40–50 mi·wk−1) except that cycling represented 50% of volume for the R/C group. On follow-up, 3,000-m time was 1.4% (9 seconds) slower in the R group and 3.4% (22 seconds) slower in the R/C group. No important change in estimated Vo2max was found for either group. It was concluded that cycle cross-training adequately maintained aerobic performance during the recuperative phase between the crosscountry and track seasons, comparable to the primary sport of running.

© 2003 National Strength and Conditioning Association