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GOURGOULIS VASSILIOS; AGGELOUSSIS, NICKOS; ANTONIOU, PANAGIOTIS; CHRISTOFORIDIS, CHRISTOS; MAVROMATIS, GIORGOS; GARAS, ATHANASIOS
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research: August 2002
Original Article: PDF Only
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ABSTRACTThe purpose of the current research was the comparison of the snatch technique between elite male and female weight-lifters. Two S-VHS cameras operating at 60 fields per second were used to record the snatch lifts of 6 male and 6 female Greek weightlifters under competitive conditions. The spatial coordinates of selected points on the body and the barbell were calculated using the direct linear transformation procedure, and the raw data were digitally filtered with a cutoff frequency of 4 Hz. Analyses of variance for dependent and independent samples were used to compare the selected variables in men with the corresponding variables in women. The results revealed that women flexed their knees significantly less and slower than men did during the transition phase (p < 0.05). Women also dropped under the barbell during the turnover and catch phases significantly less and slower than men did (p < 0.05). Moreover, the external mechanical work for the vertical displacement of the barbell in men was significantly greater in the first pull than in the second pull (p < 0.05). In contrast, women showed similar work outputs in the 2 phases. These differences between the 2 sexes might be because of the lower skill level of women in comparison with men, which is partly because of the recent participation of women in weightlifting.

The purpose of the current research was the comparison of the snatch technique between elite male and female weight-lifters. Two S-VHS cameras operating at 60 fields per second were used to record the snatch lifts of 6 male and 6 female Greek weightlifters under competitive conditions. The spatial coordinates of selected points on the body and the barbell were calculated using the direct linear transformation procedure, and the raw data were digitally filtered with a cutoff frequency of 4 Hz. Analyses of variance for dependent and independent samples were used to compare the selected variables in men with the corresponding variables in women. The results revealed that women flexed their knees significantly less and slower than men did during the transition phase (p < 0.05). Women also dropped under the barbell during the turnover and catch phases significantly less and slower than men did (p < 0.05). Moreover, the external mechanical work for the vertical displacement of the barbell in men was significantly greater in the first pull than in the second pull (p < 0.05). In contrast, women showed similar work outputs in the 2 phases. These differences between the 2 sexes might be because of the lower skill level of women in comparison with men, which is partly because of the recent participation of women in weightlifting.

© 2002 National Strength and Conditioning Association