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Physiologic and Metabolic Responses to a Body Pump Workout

STANFORTH DIXIE; STANFORTH, PHILIP R.; HOEMEKE, MARGARET E
The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research: May 2000
Original Article: PDF Only

ABSTRACTFifteen men and 15 women completed a Body Pump workout in which Vo2 and heart rate (HR) were measured continuously. The workout was performed at a mean Vo2 of 14.8 ml·kg−1-min−1 (29.1% of Vo2peak), HR of 123.6 b·min−1 (63.0% of HRmax), and caloric expenditure of 5.3 kcal·min−1. Tracks using primarily the lower body had higher (p < 0.01) Vo2, HR, kcal·min−1, and weight lifted than tracks using primarily the upper body. Men had higher (p < 0.05) Vo2, HR, percentage HRmax, total kilocalories, and kcal·kg−1-min−1 during Body Pump than women, but there were no differences (p > 0.05) for Vo2 in ml·kg FFM−1·min−1 and kcal·kg FFM−1·min−1. Responses were below that necessary to elicit an aerobic-training effect and were lower than responses previously reported with circuit weight training.

Fifteen men and 15 women completed a Body Pump workout in which Vo2 and heart rate (HR) were measured continuously. The workout was performed at a mean Vo2 of 14.8 ml·kg−1-min−1 (29.1% of Vo2peak), HR of 123.6 b·min−1 (63.0% of HRmax), and caloric expenditure of 5.3 kcal·min−1. Tracks using primarily the lower body had higher (p < 0.01) Vo2, HR, kcal·min−1, and weight lifted than tracks using primarily the upper body. Men had higher (p < 0.05) Vo2, HR, percentage HRmax, total kilocalories, and kcal·kg−1-min−1 during Body Pump than women, but there were no differences (p > 0.05) for Vo2 in ml·kg FFM−1·min−1 and kcal·kg FFM−1·min−1. Responses were below that necessary to elicit an aerobic-training effect and were lower than responses previously reported with circuit weight training.

© 2000 National Strength and Conditioning Association