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Godard Michael P.; Wygand, John W.; Carpinelli, Ralph N.; Catalano, Steve; Otto, Robert M.
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research: February 1998
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ABSTRACTThis study tested the hypothesis that concentric resistance exercise along with an accentuated eccentric load would elicit greater increases in concentric strength than training with a similar amount of resistance for concentric and nonaccen-tuated eccentric muscle actions. Pre- and posttraining concentric one repetition max (1-RM) of the left knee extensors was used to measure strength in 28 untrained young men and women. Resistance for concentric and eccentric muscle actions was a constant external torque initially set at 80% of the concentric 1-RM for subjects in the Con/Ecc group. Resistance for the eccentric component of the Con/Ecc+ group was 40% greater than their concentric resistance. Both groups trained with one set of 8–12 unilateral repetitions (3 sec concentric, 3 sec eccentric) to muscular fatigue twice a week for 10 weeks on a Cybex 6000 dynamometer. There were significant increases in concentric knee extensor torque in both groups, with no significant difference between groups. The results suggest there is no significant further enhancement of maximal concentric torque from training with an accentuated eccentric resistance in previously untrained persons.

This study tested the hypothesis that concentric resistance exercise along with an accentuated eccentric load would elicit greater increases in concentric strength than training with a similar amount of resistance for concentric and nonaccen-tuated eccentric muscle actions. Pre- and posttraining concentric one repetition max (1-RM) of the left knee extensors was used to measure strength in 28 untrained young men and women. Resistance for concentric and eccentric muscle actions was a constant external torque initially set at 80% of the concentric 1-RM for subjects in the Con/Ecc group. Resistance for the eccentric component of the Con/Ecc+ group was 40% greater than their concentric resistance. Both groups trained with one set of 8–12 unilateral repetitions (3 sec concentric, 3 sec eccentric) to muscular fatigue twice a week for 10 weeks on a Cybex 6000 dynamometer. There were significant increases in concentric knee extensor torque in both groups, with no significant difference between groups. The results suggest there is no significant further enhancement of maximal concentric torque from training with an accentuated eccentric resistance in previously untrained persons.

© 1998 National Strength and Conditioning Association