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Herrick Andrew B.; Stone, William J.
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research: May 1996
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ABSTRACTThis study compared periodization (PER) with active rest periods to progressive resistance exercise (PRE) to determine which led to more strength gains and whether a performance plateau occurred during 15 weeks of training. Twenty women were randomly assigned to the PER group (n = 10) of the PRE group (n = 10). One repetition maximum (1-RM) was recorded for both groups on the bench press and parallel squat as a pretest, every 3 weeks, and again as a posttreatment test. Both groups trained on the same equipment 2 days a week. PER underwent 8 weeks of hypertrophy training (3 × 10-RM), 2 weeks of strength and power training (3 × 4-RM), and 2 weeks of peak training (3 × 2-RM), with a 1-week aerobic active rest period between phases. PRE maintained the same 3 × 6-RM program throughout the study. ANOVA with repeated measures revealed no statistical difference between groups for the bench press of parallel squat. PER had consistent increases in strength while PRE appeared to be plateauing near the end of the 15-week study. Volume of work performed was more powerful in determining strength than was the manipulation of repetitions, sets, or periods of active rest.

This study compared periodization (PER) with active rest periods to progressive resistance exercise (PRE) to determine which led to more strength gains and whether a performance plateau occurred during 15 weeks of training. Twenty women were randomly assigned to the PER group (n = 10) of the PRE group (n = 10). One repetition maximum (1-RM) was recorded for both groups on the bench press and parallel squat as a pretest, every 3 weeks, and again as a posttreatment test. Both groups trained on the same equipment 2 days a week. PER underwent 8 weeks of hypertrophy training (3 × 10-RM), 2 weeks of strength and power training (3 × 4-RM), and 2 weeks of peak training (3 × 2-RM), with a 1-week aerobic active rest period between phases. PRE maintained the same 3 × 6-RM program throughout the study. ANOVA with repeated measures revealed no statistical difference between groups for the bench press of parallel squat. PER had consistent increases in strength while PRE appeared to be plateauing near the end of the 15-week study. Volume of work performed was more powerful in determining strength than was the manipulation of repetitions, sets, or periods of active rest.

© 1996 National Strength and Conditioning Association