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Holcomb William R.; Lander, Jeffrey E.; Rutland, Rodney M.; Wilson, G. Dennis
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research: May 1996
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ABSTRACTPlyometric exercise is often used to improved power and the vertical jump (VJ). This study tested the effect of a modified plyometric program. Subjects, 51 college-age men, underwent pre- and posttesting to determine power and VJ height. The modified plyometric depth jump program (n = 10) was compared to a control (n = 9), a countermovement jump program (n = 10), a weight training program (n = 12), and a conventional plyometric DJ program (n = 10). The test jumps were the countermovement jump (CMJ) and a static jump (SJ). The subjects trained 3 days a week for 8 week for 8 weeks. All groups improved in both peak power and VJ. For CMJ the peak power increased in all training groups but decreased in the control group. ANOVA with repeated measures were used to compare pre- and posttest scores for all training groups. No significant differences were found for power and VJ height between the various training methods; but these results should provide a guide for athletes seeking improvements in power and VJ.

Plyometric exercise is often used to improved power and the vertical jump (VJ). This study tested the effect of a modified plyometric program. Subjects, 51 college-age men, underwent pre- and posttesting to determine power and VJ height. The modified plyometric depth jump program (n = 10) was compared to a control (n = 9), a countermovement jump program (n = 10), a weight training program (n = 12), and a conventional plyometric DJ program (n = 10). The test jumps were the countermovement jump (CMJ) and a static jump (SJ). The subjects trained 3 days a week for 8 week for 8 weeks. All groups improved in both peak power and VJ. For CMJ the peak power increased in all training groups but decreased in the control group. ANOVA with repeated measures were used to compare pre- and posttest scores for all training groups. No significant differences were found for power and VJ height between the various training methods; but these results should provide a guide for athletes seeking improvements in power and VJ.

© 1996 National Strength and Conditioning Association