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Bulbulian Ronald; Chandler, Jeff; Amos, Mary
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research: February 1996
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ABSTRACTThis study evaluated combined sprint (S) and endurance (E) training for improving anaerobic and aerobic capacity. Seventeen trained subjects (12 M, 5 F) were randomly assigned to either the E, S, or control group. For 8 weeks the S group supplemented their normal 3-day-a-week workout with 30-min sprint-walk intervals while E added aerobic activity. The dependent variables measured were isokinetic knee flexion/extension, the USTA sport science test protocol, treadmill maximal oxygen consumption (JOURNAL/jscr/04.02/00124278-199602000-00010/ENTITY_OV0312/v/2017-07-20T235158Z/r/image-pngO2max), and body composition (%F). All tests were conducted before and after training. Results showed limited improvements in a few variables. Peak torque showed no change at 60° · sec−1 but a trend for improvement at 300° · sec−1 in S and E. Treadmill time to exhaustion increased in S but not in E. The data suggest that training is exercise specific and thus testing procedures must take this specificity into account. Also, additional endurance training does not seem to prevent a trend for increases in the rate of rise for torque at 300° · sec−1 Finally, it appears that sprint training may enhance aerobic capacity.

This study evaluated combined sprint (S) and endurance (E) training for improving anaerobic and aerobic capacity. Seventeen trained subjects (12 M, 5 F) were randomly assigned to either the E, S, or control group. For 8 weeks the S group supplemented their normal 3-day-a-week workout with 30-min sprint-walk intervals while E added aerobic activity. The dependent variables measured were isokinetic knee flexion/extension, the USTA sport science test protocol, treadmill maximal oxygen consumption (JOURNAL/jscr/04.02/00124278-199602000-00010/ENTITY_OV0312/v/2017-07-20T235158Z/r/image-pngO2max), and body composition (%F). All tests were conducted before and after training. Results showed limited improvements in a few variables. Peak torque showed no change at 60° · sec−1 but a trend for improvement at 300° · sec−1 in S and E. Treadmill time to exhaustion increased in S but not in E. The data suggest that training is exercise specific and thus testing procedures must take this specificity into account. Also, additional endurance training does not seem to prevent a trend for increases in the rate of rise for torque at 300° · sec−1 Finally, it appears that sprint training may enhance aerobic capacity.

© 1996 National Strength and Conditioning Association