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Sullivan James J.; Knowlton, Ronald G.; DeVita, Paul; Brown, Dale D.
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research: February 1996
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ABSTRACTThe purpose of this study was to determine if restricted range of motion (RErom) resistance exercise would accentuate the cardiovascular response compared to full range of motion (FLrom) resistance exercise. Subjects (N = 14, age 24 ± 2.5 yrs) were experienced male weight trainers. Using a counterbalanced design, each subject underwent a control and treatment condition performing 4 sets of biceps curls at 40% 1-RM. FLrom involved 4 sets of 8 full range-of-motion repetitions, while RErom consisted of 4 sets of varying restricted range-of-motion exercise. Total angular displacement, rate of movement, and time per set were equal for both conditions and all sets. Heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) data were obtained immediately after each exercise set. Blood pH and lactate (HLA) data were obtained at rest and postexercise. High speed cinematography data were obtained on 3 subjects to assist in data interpretation. Results from repeated measures two-way ANOVA showed that RErom significantly increased HR, HLA, and RPE compared to FLrom (p < 0.05), with no effect on BP and pH. Analysis of the joint torques indicated that Sets 2, 3, and 4 of RErom produced more angular impulse than at FLrom. It was concluded that restricted range-of-motion forearm flexion exercise increases the cardiovascular response and torque production compared to full range-of-motion exercise.

The purpose of this study was to determine if restricted range of motion (RErom) resistance exercise would accentuate the cardiovascular response compared to full range of motion (FLrom) resistance exercise. Subjects (N = 14, age 24 ± 2.5 yrs) were experienced male weight trainers. Using a counterbalanced design, each subject underwent a control and treatment condition performing 4 sets of biceps curls at 40% 1-RM. FLrom involved 4 sets of 8 full range-of-motion repetitions, while RErom consisted of 4 sets of varying restricted range-of-motion exercise. Total angular displacement, rate of movement, and time per set were equal for both conditions and all sets. Heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) data were obtained immediately after each exercise set. Blood pH and lactate (HLA) data were obtained at rest and postexercise. High speed cinematography data were obtained on 3 subjects to assist in data interpretation. Results from repeated measures two-way ANOVA showed that RErom significantly increased HR, HLA, and RPE compared to FLrom (p < 0.05), with no effect on BP and pH. Analysis of the joint torques indicated that Sets 2, 3, and 4 of RErom produced more angular impulse than at FLrom. It was concluded that restricted range-of-motion forearm flexion exercise increases the cardiovascular response and torque production compared to full range-of-motion exercise.

© 1996 National Strength and Conditioning Association