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Kleiner Douglas M.; Chad Snyder, R.
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research: November 1995
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ABSTRACTThe present study examined the effects of hyperoxia (HO) (>21% O2) on heart rate, muscular strength, and muscular endurance. Fifty subjects performed single-leg, isokinetic knee exercises at 60° · sec−1. Each subject took part in 3 treatments (HO [100% O2], normoxia [NO], and room air [RA] in random order, 1 week apart. Heart rates were determined by electrocardiogram. The data revealed significantly (p < 0.05) lower heart rates for the HO treatment during the resting condition. However, peak hearts rates did not differ significantly (p > 0.05) between treatments. The number of repetitions completed was significantly different (p < 0.05). Peak torque and total work did not differ significantly (p > 0.05), although total work values were greatest during HO. These preliminary data suggest that while HO can lower resting heart rate and may increase the capacity for endurance, it has little effect of muscular strength.

The present study examined the effects of hyperoxia (HO) (>21% O2) on heart rate, muscular strength, and muscular endurance. Fifty subjects performed single-leg, isokinetic knee exercises at 60° · sec−1. Each subject took part in 3 treatments (HO [100% O2], normoxia [NO], and room air [RA] in random order, 1 week apart. Heart rates were determined by electrocardiogram. The data revealed significantly (p < 0.05) lower heart rates for the HO treatment during the resting condition. However, peak hearts rates did not differ significantly (p > 0.05) between treatments. The number of repetitions completed was significantly different (p < 0.05). Peak torque and total work did not differ significantly (p > 0.05), although total work values were greatest during HO. These preliminary data suggest that while HO can lower resting heart rate and may increase the capacity for endurance, it has little effect of muscular strength.

© 1995 National Strength and Conditioning Association