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Zabukovec Randy; Tiidus, Peter M.
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research: November 1995
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ABSTRACTThe anthropometric and physiological characteristics of kickboxers were investigated. Professional male middleweight (73–77 kg) and welterweight (63–67 kg) kickboxers were determined to have relatively higher aerobic capacities (JOURNAL/jscr/04.02/00124278-199511000-00007/ENTITY_OV0312/v/2017-07-20T235155Z/r/image-pngO2max, 54–69 ml · kg−1 · min−1), anaerobic capacities (8.2–11.2 W · kg−1), and knee extension peak torques (2.8–3.3 Nm · kg−1 @ 60° · sec−1) than previously reported for many other power or combat athletes. Kickboxers also tended to be lean (6.1–10.8% BF) and were classified as mesomedial body types on the Health-Carter somatotype scale. This suggests that elite kickboxers demonstrate a high level of aerobic and anaerobic conditioning along with the ability to produce high muscle forces.

The anthropometric and physiological characteristics of kickboxers were investigated. Professional male middleweight (73–77 kg) and welterweight (63–67 kg) kickboxers were determined to have relatively higher aerobic capacities (JOURNAL/jscr/04.02/00124278-199511000-00007/ENTITY_OV0312/v/2017-07-20T235155Z/r/image-pngO2max, 54–69 ml · kg−1 · min−1), anaerobic capacities (8.2–11.2 W · kg−1), and knee extension peak torques (2.8–3.3 Nm · kg−1 @ 60° · sec−1) than previously reported for many other power or combat athletes. Kickboxers also tended to be lean (6.1–10.8% BF) and were classified as mesomedial body types on the Health-Carter somatotype scale. This suggests that elite kickboxers demonstrate a high level of aerobic and anaerobic conditioning along with the ability to produce high muscle forces.

© 1995 National Strength and Conditioning Association