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Evangelisti Margaret I.; Verde, Tony J.; Andres, Fredrick F.; Flynn, Michael G.
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research: November 1995
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ABSTRACTThe physiological responses of two cycling postures were evaluated in 8 trained male cyclists. Each cyclist performed two random-order cycle ergometer trails, one in an aerodynamic position (AP) and the other in a conventional drop position (DP). Each trial lasted 60 min and was performed at a power output calculated to elicit 70% of max JOURNAL/jscr/04.02/00124278-199511000-00008/ENTITY_OV0312/v/2017-07-20T235155Z/r/image-pngO2 while pedaling at 90 rev · min−1. Oxygen cost, heart rate, and systolic and diastolic blood pressures were measured every 10 min throughout each trial. Cycling in the AP yielded a consistently lower diastolic blood pressure response. Cycling in the DP yielded lower heart rate and oxygen costs. These results suggest that changes in body position due to the use of different handlebars can significantly influence the physiological cost of cycling. Since body position influences physiological responses, each cyclist should be tested in the laboratory in his or her race position, with modification if necessary, so that an accurate training program can be developed.

The physiological responses of two cycling postures were evaluated in 8 trained male cyclists. Each cyclist performed two random-order cycle ergometer trails, one in an aerodynamic position (AP) and the other in a conventional drop position (DP). Each trial lasted 60 min and was performed at a power output calculated to elicit 70% of max JOURNAL/jscr/04.02/00124278-199511000-00008/ENTITY_OV0312/v/2017-07-20T235155Z/r/image-pngO2 while pedaling at 90 rev · min−1. Oxygen cost, heart rate, and systolic and diastolic blood pressures were measured every 10 min throughout each trial. Cycling in the AP yielded a consistently lower diastolic blood pressure response. Cycling in the DP yielded lower heart rate and oxygen costs. These results suggest that changes in body position due to the use of different handlebars can significantly influence the physiological cost of cycling. Since body position influences physiological responses, each cyclist should be tested in the laboratory in his or her race position, with modification if necessary, so that an accurate training program can be developed.

© 1995 National Strength and Conditioning Association