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Tharp Gerald D.; Weir, Loree L.; Weir, Joseph P.; Stout, Jeff
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research: November 1995
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ABSTRACTThis study examined the effects of an 8-wk aerobic training program on urine levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) in the resting state and after max and submax exercise bouts. MDA is commonly used as an indicator of lipid peroxidation resulting from free radial reactions. Untrained college students, ages 19 to 26, were divided into training and control groups. Both groups performed a maximal bicycle ergometer test before and after the 8-week training period. The training group exercised on a bicycle ergometer for 30 min at 85% HR max 3 times a week for 8 weeks. Urine samples were collected before and after the maximal tests, and the training exercise bouts during Weeks 1, 4, and 8 of the training period. MDA was assayed using fluorometric technique. Urine MDA levels were not significantly changed after either the max or submax exercise bouts. There was a significant increase in preexercise resting levels of urine MDA in the training group over the 8-week period. This suggests that moderate aerobic training may produce a cumulative increase in lipid peroxidation due to free radical activity.

This study examined the effects of an 8-wk aerobic training program on urine levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) in the resting state and after max and submax exercise bouts. MDA is commonly used as an indicator of lipid peroxidation resulting from free radial reactions. Untrained college students, ages 19 to 26, were divided into training and control groups. Both groups performed a maximal bicycle ergometer test before and after the 8-week training period. The training group exercised on a bicycle ergometer for 30 min at 85% HR max 3 times a week for 8 weeks. Urine samples were collected before and after the maximal tests, and the training exercise bouts during Weeks 1, 4, and 8 of the training period. MDA was assayed using fluorometric technique. Urine MDA levels were not significantly changed after either the max or submax exercise bouts. There was a significant increase in preexercise resting levels of urine MDA in the training group over the 8-week period. This suggests that moderate aerobic training may produce a cumulative increase in lipid peroxidation due to free radical activity.

© 1995 National Strength and Conditioning Association