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Jay Silvester L
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research: May 1995
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ABSTRACTTwenty-two former athletes (mean age 47.8 yrs) were interviewed. All had used anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) during their competitive years. Ages at which they began taking AAS ranged from 19 to 39 years. Mean time of ingestion was 7.82 yrs; mean daily dosage was 31.95 mg. Acute effects reported were as follows: twenty athletes had an increase in strength and power, 5 had quicker recovery from workouts, 3 had problems with acne, 4 had gynecomastia difficulties, 3 were more susceptible to muscle pulls, and 3 had weakened immune systems. Thirteen athletes had an increase in aggressiveness and 10 had distinct feelings of well-being. Concerning long-range health problems attributable to AAS use, responses indicated that 18 had none, one had an unspecified negative effect, one had shrinking testicles, and for one the use of AAS in combination with Olympic lifting caused spinal spurs. Concerning long-range psychological effects, 20 had none while 2 were more aggressive or irritable than they would like to be. Two regretted taking AAS.

Twenty-two former athletes (mean age 47.8 yrs) were interviewed. All had used anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) during their competitive years. Ages at which they began taking AAS ranged from 19 to 39 years. Mean time of ingestion was 7.82 yrs; mean daily dosage was 31.95 mg. Acute effects reported were as follows: twenty athletes had an increase in strength and power, 5 had quicker recovery from workouts, 3 had problems with acne, 4 had gynecomastia difficulties, 3 were more susceptible to muscle pulls, and 3 had weakened immune systems. Thirteen athletes had an increase in aggressiveness and 10 had distinct feelings of well-being. Concerning long-range health problems attributable to AAS use, responses indicated that 18 had none, one had an unspecified negative effect, one had shrinking testicles, and for one the use of AAS in combination with Olympic lifting caused spinal spurs. Concerning long-range psychological effects, 20 had none while 2 were more aggressive or irritable than they would like to be. Two regretted taking AAS.

© 1995 National Strength and Conditioning Association