Secondary Logo

Journal Logo

Michaud Thomas J.; Brennan, David K.; Wilder, Robert P.; Sherman, Nestor W.
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research: May 1995
Article: PDF Only
Free

ABSTRACTThe primary purpose of this investigation was to determine the effects of deep-water run training on treadmill exercise (TM) and deep-water running (DWR) maximal oxygen consumptions (JOURNAL/jscr/04.02/00124278-199505000-00004/ENTITY_OV0312/v/2017-07-20T235152Z/r/image-pngO2). Ten (8 F, 2 M) healthy sedentary subjects participated in randomly assigned TM and DWR JOURNAL/jscr/04.02/00124278-199505000-00004/ENTITY_OV0312/v/2017-07-20T235152Z/r/image-pngO2max tests both pre- and posttraining. Treadmill JOURNAL/jscr/04.02/00124278-199505000-00004/ENTITY_OV0312/v/2017-07-20T235152Z/r/image-pngO2max was assessed using either the Bruce protocol or a modification of it. Each deep-water running JOURNAL/jscr/04.02/00124278-199505000-00004/ENTITY_OV0312/v/2017-07-20T235152Z/r/image-pngO2max test began at a warm-up cadence of 48 cycles · min−1, a cycle consisting of two steps. Thereafter intensity was increased by increasing leg cadence (66, 72, 76, etc.) every 3 min. Participants also underwent an 8-wk progressive, aerobic, interval deep-water running program. The sessions were conducted 3 days a week at 63 to 82% heart rate max for 16 to 36 min. Deep-water running produced gains in JOURNAL/jscr/04.02/00124278-199505000-00004/ENTITY_OV0312/v/2017-07-20T235152Z/r/image-pngO2max of 10.6 for TM and 20.1% for DWR. Posttraining JOURNAL/jscr/04.02/00124278-199505000-00004/ENTITY_OV0312/v/2017-07-20T235152Z/r/image-pngO2max values for TM and DWR were significantly greater than pretraining values. Thus deep-water run training improved the cardiorespiratory fitness of sedentary adults, produced greater gains in deep-water running JOURNAL/jscr/04.02/00124278-199505000-00004/ENTITY_OV0312/v/2017-07-20T235152Z/r/image-pngO2max than in treadmill exercise JOURNAL/jscr/04.02/00124278-199505000-00004/ENTITY_OV0312/v/2017-07-20T235152Z/r/image-pngO2max, and resulted in a training carryover effect to treadmill exercise.

The primary purpose of this investigation was to determine the effects of deep-water run training on treadmill exercise (TM) and deep-water running (DWR) maximal oxygen consumptions (JOURNAL/jscr/04.02/00124278-199505000-00004/ENTITY_OV0312/v/2017-07-20T235152Z/r/image-pngO2). Ten (8 F, 2 M) healthy sedentary subjects participated in randomly assigned TM and DWR JOURNAL/jscr/04.02/00124278-199505000-00004/ENTITY_OV0312/v/2017-07-20T235152Z/r/image-pngO2max tests both pre- and posttraining. Treadmill JOURNAL/jscr/04.02/00124278-199505000-00004/ENTITY_OV0312/v/2017-07-20T235152Z/r/image-pngO2max was assessed using either the Bruce protocol or a modification of it. Each deep-water running JOURNAL/jscr/04.02/00124278-199505000-00004/ENTITY_OV0312/v/2017-07-20T235152Z/r/image-pngO2max test began at a warm-up cadence of 48 cycles · min−1, a cycle consisting of two steps. Thereafter intensity was increased by increasing leg cadence (66, 72, 76, etc.) every 3 min. Participants also underwent an 8-wk progressive, aerobic, interval deep-water running program. The sessions were conducted 3 days a week at 63 to 82% heart rate max for 16 to 36 min. Deep-water running produced gains in JOURNAL/jscr/04.02/00124278-199505000-00004/ENTITY_OV0312/v/2017-07-20T235152Z/r/image-pngO2max of 10.6 for TM and 20.1% for DWR. Posttraining JOURNAL/jscr/04.02/00124278-199505000-00004/ENTITY_OV0312/v/2017-07-20T235152Z/r/image-pngO2max values for TM and DWR were significantly greater than pretraining values. Thus deep-water run training improved the cardiorespiratory fitness of sedentary adults, produced greater gains in deep-water running JOURNAL/jscr/04.02/00124278-199505000-00004/ENTITY_OV0312/v/2017-07-20T235152Z/r/image-pngO2max than in treadmill exercise JOURNAL/jscr/04.02/00124278-199505000-00004/ENTITY_OV0312/v/2017-07-20T235152Z/r/image-pngO2max, and resulted in a training carryover effect to treadmill exercise.

© 1995 National Strength and Conditioning Association