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Mosher Patricia E.; Underwood, Steven A.; Ferguson, Michael A.; Arnold, Ryan O.
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research: August 1994
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ABSTRACTThis study determined the effects of a combined aerobic and circuit weight training program on maximal oxygen consumption, body composition, and muscular strength of college-age women. Of the 33 who volunteered to participate, 17 were randomly assigned to the exercise program while the remaining 16 served as controls. The training involved a 45-min circuit of 30 activities including five 3-min aerobic exercises and 25 30-sec weight training or calisthenic exercises. The subjects exercised at 40 to 50% of their 1-RM for each weight station. Workloads for the aerobic stations were assigned based on the workload needed to elicit 75 to 85% of the maximal heart rate reached during the JOURNAL/jscr/04.02/00124278-199408000-00004/ENTITY_OV0312/v/2017-07-20T235145Z/r/image-pngO2 max test. Data were analyzed using a repeated measures ANOVA with significance established at p < 0.05. The exercise group had significant increases in JOURNAL/jscr/04.02/00124278-199408000-00004/ENTITY_OV0312/v/2017-07-20T235145Z/r/image-pngO2 max, upper body strength, and lower body strength, and significant decreases in skinfold sum and percent body fat. This indicates that an aerobic circuit weight training program is an effective way to improve cardiovascular fitness, body composition, and muscular strength in college-age women.

This study determined the effects of a combined aerobic and circuit weight training program on maximal oxygen consumption, body composition, and muscular strength of college-age women. Of the 33 who volunteered to participate, 17 were randomly assigned to the exercise program while the remaining 16 served as controls. The training involved a 45-min circuit of 30 activities including five 3-min aerobic exercises and 25 30-sec weight training or calisthenic exercises. The subjects exercised at 40 to 50% of their 1-RM for each weight station. Workloads for the aerobic stations were assigned based on the workload needed to elicit 75 to 85% of the maximal heart rate reached during the JOURNAL/jscr/04.02/00124278-199408000-00004/ENTITY_OV0312/v/2017-07-20T235145Z/r/image-pngO2 max test. Data were analyzed using a repeated measures ANOVA with significance established at p < 0.05. The exercise group had significant increases in JOURNAL/jscr/04.02/00124278-199408000-00004/ENTITY_OV0312/v/2017-07-20T235145Z/r/image-pngO2 max, upper body strength, and lower body strength, and significant decreases in skinfold sum and percent body fat. This indicates that an aerobic circuit weight training program is an effective way to improve cardiovascular fitness, body composition, and muscular strength in college-age women.

© 1994 National Strength and Conditioning Association