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Listen Up, Tune In To The Neurology Today Podcast Series

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Missed reading a Neurology Today article in print or want to hear more from our sources — remarks we didn't have room to include in print? Now you can listen to interviews at your leisure. Check out these and other podcasts here: http://bit.ly/rCBryX

Dr. Mark Albers: Could Olfactory Deficits Be Risk Factors for Dementia?

Two new studies presented at the Alzheimer's Association meeting in Copenhagen found that people in the early stages of Alzheimer's have subtle deficits in odor identification, a finding that could help diagnose the disease very early on. In this podcast, Neurology Today speaks with Mark Albers, MD, PhD, assistant professor of neurology at Harvard University and a neurologist at Massachusetts General Hospital, and Davangere Devanand, MD, professor of psychiatry at Columbia University Medical Center, about their research. For more information, see the article about the study in Neurology Today: http://bit.ly/olfactory-NT/

Dr. Sean Pittock: Is Immunotherapy Helpful for Autoimmune Epilepsy?

In a study in Neurology, Sean J. Pittock, MD, an associate professor of neurology and co-director of the Neuroimmunology Laboratory at Mayo Clinic, and colleagues reported encouraging, but preliminary results for the use of immunotherapy in medically intractable patients with suspected autoimmune epilepsy. In this interview, Dr. Pittock discusses the findings, and what future studies are necessary. For more information, see the article about the study in Neurology Today: http://bit.ly/autoimmune-NT.

Dr. Reisa A. Sperling: The Anti-Amyloid Treatment in Asymptomatic Alzheimer's Disease Trial

What could the findings from the Anti-Amyloid Treatment in Asymptomatic Alzheimer's Disease trial (A4) — a new secondary prevention trial in older people with amyloid accumulation at high risk for Alzheimer's disease dementia — mean for Alzheimer's disease? Earlier detection and possibly earlier intervention, according to the lead author of the A4 trial. In this podcast interview, Reisa A. Sperling, MD, a professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School and director of the Center for Alzheimer's Research and Treatment at the Brigham and Women's Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital, discusses the challenges the investigators foresee and the possible benefits. For more information, see the article about the study in Neurology Today: http://bit.ly/A4-NT

Dr. Vijayshree Yadav : The AAN Guideline Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Multiple Sclerosis

MS patients turn to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) to try to reduce the disease burden. These treatments, however, are not without their own unique risks — especially since CAM is largely unregulated and inadequately studied.

In order to provide guidance to neurologists and their patients, the AAN Guideline Development Subcommittee conducted a comprehensive review of the available literature (from 1970 to 2013) on CAM therapies for MS. “The AAN recognized that people with MS tend to use CAM therapy quite frequently, but that there was a lack of scientifically validated information or educational materials for providers to educate themselves or their patients in a systematic way,” said study author Vijayshree Yadav, MD, an assistant professor of neurology at Oregon Health and Sciences University Multiple Sclerosis Center. In an interview with Neurology Today, she discussed the new recommendations — their practical applications, unexpected findings, and remaining research needs. Read the Neurology Today article about the guideline here: http://bit.ly/CAM-MS-NT

LISTEN UP, TUNE IN TO THE NEUROLOGY TODAY PODCAST SERIES

Figure

No caption available.

Missed reading a Neurology Today article in print or want to hear more from our sources — remarks we didn't have room to include in print? Now you can listen to interviews at your leisure. Check out these and other podcasts here: http://bit.ly/rCBryX

  • Dr. Bruce H. Cohen: Where Will Neurologists Fit in with Accountable Care Organizations? How will the ACO movement affect your practice? Bruce H. Cohen, MD, professor of pediatrics and director of neurology in the NeuroDevelopmental Science Center at Akron Children's Hospital in Ohio, discusses the implications for independent practice and academic practice.
  • Dr. Constantine Moschonas: Shifts in Hospital Practice Could Bode Well for Neurology What will independent practice entail in the future? Constantine Moschonas, MD, director of Four Peaks Neurology in Scottsdale, AZ, shares his vision for the future of patient-centered medical care.
  • Dr. Daniel Hoch: How Online Patient Communities Can Lead to Better Care How and why should neurologists stay tuned to online patient communities? Daniel Hoch, MD, PhD, a Harvard University professor, epilepsy specialist, and director of Digital Initiatives for the Benson Henry Institute for Mind Body Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital, discussed why listening to what patients have to say could promote research advances and improved care.
  • Dr. Richard M. Dubinsky: Why the Quality Reporting System Is Here to Stay How does neurology compare with other specialties in quality measurement? Richard M. Dubinsky, MD, MPH, program director for the neurology residency program at University of Kansas Medical Center, offers his assessment here of neurology's challenges — and its leadership.
  • Dr. Raj D. Sheth on AEDs in Adults and Children Can data from clinical trials of antiepileptic drugs in adults be extrapolated to predict treatment response for children? Raj D. Sheth, MD, chief of neurology at Nemours and professor of neurology at Mayo Clinic College of Medicine in Jacksonville, FL, discusses the strengths and limitations of a new review published in the Sept. 5 online edition of Neurology.
  • Dr. Avindra Nath Discusses West Nile Virus Dr. Avindra Nath, chief of the Section of Infections of the Nervous System and clinical director of National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), discusses West Nile virus in humans, as well as research and treatments currently in the pipeline.