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Functional properties of axolotl transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 revealed by the heterologous expression system

Oda, Maia; Ogino, Hajimea; Kubo, Yoshihirob,c; Saitoh, Osamua

doi: 10.1097/WNR.0000000000001197
CELLULAR, MOLECULAR AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE
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Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) from tetrapod vertebrates except rodents are activated by high temperature with a relatively clear threshold. Our recent investigation suggested that a gradual heat activation without clear threshold might be a common feature for TRPA1 of fish. To approach which animal first acquires TRPA1 as a threshold detector instead of a gradual heat sensor, here, we focused on TRPA1 from axolotls (Ambystoma mexicanum). We isolated a full-length cDNA of axolotl transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (axTRPA1) and studied the functional properties by two-electrode voltage clamp method using Xenopus oocytes. Allyl isothiocyanate, caffeine, methyl anthranilate and carvacrol activated axTRPA1 channels. The results indicated that axTRPA1 is heat activated with the average threshold of 39.7°C, suggesting that axTRPA1 already has acquired the functional property of land animals.

aDepartment of Animal Bio-Science, Faculty of Bio-Science, Nagahama Institute of Bio-Science and Technology, Nagahama, Shiga Prefecture

bDivision of Biophysics and Neurobiology, Department of Molecular & Cellular Physiology, National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Okazaki, Aichi Prefecture

cDepartment of Physiological Sciences, School of Life Science, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), Hayama, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan

Present address: Mai Oda: Department of Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi, Japan

Present address: Hajime Ogino: Amphibian Research Center, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima, Japan

Correspondence to Osamu Saitoh, PhD, Department of Animal Bio-Science, Faculty of Bio-Science, Nagahama Institute of Bio-Science and Technology, 1266 Tamura-cho, Nagahama-shi 526-0829, Shiga, Japan Tel/fax: +81 749 648 165; e-mail: o_saito@nagahama-i-bio.ac.jp

Received September 28, 2018

Accepted December 31, 2018

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